Where language meets culture

After the release of his book, “Decolonising The Mind”, Ngugi Wa Thiong’o’s decision to stop using English as the language in which he will offer his work sparked a lot debates about the use of language in African literature. The book, which contains four essays, “The Language of African Literature,” “The Language of African Theatre,” “The Language of African Fiction,” and “The Quest for Relevance,” helped to “cement him as a preeminent voice theorising the “language debate” in post-colonial studies.”[1] And ever since, the release of this book the number of debates on this issue has not decreased.

As a self-proclaimed Pan-African thinker and an aspiring writer, the debate about language and literature has plagued my mind for some time now. Writers of both fiction and non-fiction play an important role in both the preservation and development of cultures. Because of the oral nature of the passing down of cultural practices and traditions by the past generations, the role of writers of the current generation is one of paramount importance. As the people responsible for the documenting and preservation of these cultural traditions and practices, writers need to use methods that will be able to carry forward this almost mammoth task with ease and precision.

Now as a country with 11 official languages, the issue of which language(s) we need to use to document the multiple and diverse cultures, and their practices, found in South Africa is one that needs to be thoroughly discussed. Some have argued that English is the ideal language to use because of its ability to cut through cultures and evolve with time, but even though it is the medium of instruction in our education system, its colonial and oppressive origins tend to rub a lot of South Africans, and Africans, the wrong way.

The use of English in African literature, be it rightly or wrongly, forms a significant part of the debate about the use of language in African literature. With it being one of the most preferred languages to use in literature, questions about whether work written in this colonial language can be classified as “African literature” have led to multiple essays and lectures being given in an effort to answer them.

In his book “Hello Africa: Tell Me How Are You Doing?” Osei G Kofi says ‘we make too much of ethnicity and tribal languages,’ he believes that ‘language is a tool, a vehicle, not an end on itself’ when it comes to culture. Like him, I believe, that ‘a particular language is useful for the particular era it is used,’ and that in this particular era English seems to be that language. According to him, 96 percent of the world’s population account for the top 20 languages, and that every two weeks a language dies[2]

Using English as a vehicle in which we will document and preserve our cultures will not change, whitewash, or dilute them in anyway. The English language, which will soon be outlived or progressively transformed for a new era, will only serve as a tool for us to document our histories as they unfold so that the future generation, and the present one, can be able to know and cement their place in the world. I have never been able to write in my native language – Setswana – but that does not mean I am not able to properly translate the rich qualities of the Tswana people and their different tribes through my work.

My adoption and use of the English language as a writer does not make the work I produce about the cultures of Africans any less important than that of someone writing in Igbo, Tsonga, Venda, Kiswahili or Setswana.

References:
[1] Wikipedia

[2] Hello Africa: Tell Me, How Are You Doing – Osie G Kofi (page 142)


5-minutes-with-Kedibone

What’s your passion?

Youth development and education. I am passionate about changing lives and I believe that can only be done through education. To implement what I have learned and empower my community.



What change are you keen to drive?

Teen pregnancy and parenthood. As well as stopping youth from dropping out of school and promoting a healthy lifestyle.

 

How are you driving change?

I am a Peer Educator at the Institution for Youth Development and Advocacy. My role is to have health talks at schools and in communities with youth about the dangers of engaging in risky behaviour such as having ‘sugar daddies,’ drinking and smoking.

With fellow Activators, Plaas Phakgabi and Kagiso Maplala we started a co-operative, Sediketheka (the light that is bright). We reach out to youth and give them motivational talks. We also offer team building, event management, facilitation and training. Currently we are facilitating a Department of Sports & Recreation camp with youth that are 15 – 25 years old, offering leadership training and highlighting the importance of social cohesion in order to build our nation.

 

How has ACTIVATE! supported you so far in driving this change?

My confidence has grown. Before I was only a peer educator but now I am more active in the community. Activators are from different parts of the country and we all have different apparitions and it’s beneficial and inspirational when we collaborate and grow our visions – the co-operative is a great example.

 

How do you motivate yourself?

Changing one person’s life keeps me going.

 

Final comment?

The most important thing I want to see is youth participate in their community’s development and to for there to be zero school dropouts. I want young people to learn from me so that they can educate themselves and move forward.

 

Cultural Heritage

!ke e:/xarra//ke, as our South African National Coat of Arms motto simply puts it “Diverse People Unite”. It represents the cultural diversity that South Africans have been striving towards since the birth of the Freedom Charter and the 1994 democratic elections. However, what could be the critical contribution of young South Africans in appreciating the diversity of cultural heritage of Africa?

“Cultural heritage is an expression of the ways of living developed by a community passed on from generation including customs, practices, places, objects, artistic expressions and values. Cultural heritage is often expressed as either intangible or tangible cultural heritage” (ICOMOS, 2002). From the definition above we can agree to disagree that there have been a number of debates amongst the youths from loss of identity due to colonisation, skin bleaching and go the famous UCT Rhodes must fall movement. Over and above these concerns, South Africa has being in international news with the recent discovery of Homo Naledi fossils by Wits University and a team led by Prof. Lee Berger. Young South Africans can appreciate this heritage discovery by visiting cultural sited such as The Maropeng Cradle of Humankind and thus continue asking questions, debating and having dialogues that will further enrich not only the South African cultural heritage but the African cultural heritage at large.

Young people can also contribute by starting small businesses that are focused on the African cultural heritage these can also empower others on the different dress styles/fashion and indegenous foods that are available in all parts of Africa. For instance, the Maasai attire of Kenya and Tsonga attire of South Africa embodies how each represent the diversity of Africa and morden culture. Such contribution by young people also has a potential to not only grow African Entrepreneurship but the African economy in the context of the diversity of the African cultural heritage while curbing unemployment. 

South African youths are also faced with the issue of moral degeneration, however they can contribute to cultural heritage by appreciating and practicing African values and proverbs that has been passed from generation to generation, e.g “Ubuntu” and ” Oran a azu nwa- it takes a village or community to raise a child” which both and many more others can be traced in almost all parts of Africa, though the languages are different the meaning is usually the same. As young South Africans we can hold each other accountable in our daily lives to ensure we strive towards achieving such values found in the African cultural heritage.

Indeed “Diverse People Unite” by being one as young South Africans we stand to inspire one another about the rich cultural heritage we possess as Africans and stand to combat negative influences such as Xenophobia/Afrophobia and racism which only robs us of appreciating our African cultural heritage. #TanzaniaLHR

This was originally posted on the National Heritage Council Facebook Page

5 Minutes With Gratitude

What’s your passion?

The health side of youth development – to cultivate youth holistically and make them aware of the importance of living a healthy lifestyle today. To bring about cohesion between youth and adults relating to youth health and to be an advocate for young fathers.  

 

What change are you keen to drive?

 

Challenging and championing health in the youth sector. Raising awareness about teenage pregnancy, sex between youth and adults and highlighting the important role a mother and father plays in a child’s life.

 

How are you driving change?

 

I facilitate dialogues in two places: At Mphephu clinic between health workers and youth – the aim is to open a channel of communication between all stakeholders so that youth-friendly health services can be achieved. Lufunodrop Centre – we host dialogues and motivational talks to the kids at the centre and highlight the importance of making healthy life choices and offer guidance to teens who are pregnant or are parents.

 

I really encourage teen fathers to attend the interventions because pregnancy is seen as a girl child’s issue and I feel it is very important to engage with these young men so that both the mother and father knows the important role that they each play in raising a child. 

 

How has ACTIVATE! supported you so far in driving this change?

 

The training has equipped me with innovative tools such as the object tools and archetypes as I use them to solve issues and to communicate with stakeholders involved in helping drive change. Networking and connecting with other young people who are also passionate about youth development is inspiring as we talk and share ideas with each other.

 

How do you motivate yourself?

 

 I see no failure; every obstacle is a learning curve. Coming from a broken family and being a single-mother to a four-month-old-baby motivates me to keep working hard to better the lives of my siblings and others in the same situation. 

 

Final comment?

 

I want to see a cohesive society that values the activities of youth and that is open to youth issues. To develop communities that are educational based and not discouraged by its negative circumstances.

PROVINCE: Limpopo

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT: Vhembe

Activator since: 2015

 

What’s your passion?
The health side of youth development – to cultivate youth holistically and make them aware 
of the importance of living a healthy lifestyle today.
To bring about cohesion between youth and adults relating to youth health and to be an 
advocate for young fathers. 
 
What change are you keen to drive?
Challenging and championing health in the youth sector. Raising awareness about teenage 
pregnancy, sex between youth and adults and highlighting the important role a mother and 
father plays in a child’s life.
How are you driving change?
I facilitate dialogues in two places:
At Mphephu clinic between health workers and youth – the aim is to open a channel of 
communication between all stakeholders so that youth-friendly health services can be 
achieved.
 
Lufunodrop Cente – we host dialogues and motivational talks to the kids at the centre and 
highlight the importance of making healthy life choices and offer guidance to teens who are 
pregnant or are parents.
I really encourage teen fathers to attend the interventions because pregnancy is seen as a 
girl child’s issue and I feel it is very important to engage with these young men so that both 
the mother and father knows the important role that they each play in raising a child.  
How has ACTIVATE! supported you so far in driving this change?
The training has equipped me with innovative tools such as the object tools and archetypes 
as I use them to solve issues and to communicate with stakeholders involved in helping 
drive change.
Networking and connecting with other young people who are also passionate about youth 
development is inspiring as we talk and share ideas with each other.
How do you motivate yourself?
I see no failure; every obstacle is a learning curve.
Coming from a broken family and being a single-mother to a four-month-old-baby motivates 
me to keep working hard to better the lives of my siblings and others in the same situation.  
Final comment?
I want to see a cohesive society that values the activities of youth and that is open to 
youth issues. To develop communities that are educational based and not 
discouraged by its negative circumstances.

The Cancer Of Corruption

Conversation with Men

In a quest to mobilise men to regain their dignity and role model reputation through doing well within our society, Thabang Mabuza and Bongani Mgayo launched the inaugural Conversation with Men at The Venue in Kwa-Thema on Sunday, 13 September 2015.

The Conversation with Men idea was inspired by the ongoing perception that men’s barbaric tendencies are due to weakened family values and communities are increasingly getting scared of the monsters that men have become.

‘The Networking powerful men who want to make a difference’, themed Master of Ceremony was Cape Town based motivational speaker, entrepreneur and co-founder of Conversation with Men seminars, Bongani Mgayo. The event content addressed issues such as economic participation, ways of not just surviving but thriving in business, importance of a healthy lifestyle, how politics affect men’s daily lives and mastering spiritual ways of managing life as men.

List of speakers was made up of business captains, religious leaders, relationship experts and different esteemed leaders from different spheres of society. Other speakers include Pastor Motlhodi Montle, Durban based young millionaire, motivational speaker, businessman and technical trader, Jabulani Cashflow Ngcobo, flamboyant socialite and gender activist, Mveleli Qwede, who is commonly known as Dr Love and Dr Callisto Sello as well as the CEO SAA Technical, Musa Zwane just to mention the few.

Gauteng 2013 Activator, entrepreneur, Power of 40 and Conversation with Men founder, Thabang Mabuza said the seminars’ aim is not just to empower men to positively participate in their communities but to also create a network of responsible revered role platform for male social change drivers. “It is critical for us as men to play our role in our own communities and family environment. If we are seen as heads, we then need to begin to take charge of that position and be role models to both women, children and fellow men who look up to us. I believe as men we can progress from poverty to prosperity provided we are prepared to pay the price”, said Mabuza.

Newly appointed North West Connector and University of Free State Politics student, Bongani Uhuru Hlatshwayo said the event came at a perfect time to teach good empowering life tools. “The event created a good platform for us as men to be acknowledged but most importantly a space where we can have an open discussion about our challenges in life and on how to overcome them”.

Hlatshwayo went on to say  that the event reinforced his belief that modern men have to move on with times and find alternative ways of not just coexisting with women but also lead inspiring positive change to their immediate family, community and the world. “Society has evolved so much into the emancipation of women and yet forgot about good men who still exist in the society and who are doing well not just for themselves but for their families and the societies at large. We need to change the status quo and celebrate the good deeds that are done by men out there”, said Hlatsawayo.

One of the attendees, Calvin Xolani Buthelezi applauded the event organisers for their brave decision to launch such an event that will heal South African young men’s’ deep emotional wounds and inspire them to always strive for excellence. “I would like to thank you for all your time spent to gather an event of this kind in such a sphere where men are dimmed off their value in the community, this shouldn’t end here actually it should be a club or committee so we can rub shoulders as we all need each as a troop to live a fruitful life”, said Buthelezi.

Organising team members, Sandile Vilakazi said the ongoing public feedback has been overwhelming and has already given them idea of what to improve on next time. “This was a successful launch. Many people now want to be part of this moving train. Moving forward, we will make sure that we intensify our marketing strategy. In a short space of time we managed to get two well-known national radio stations (Metro FM & SAFM) and local radio station (eKasi FM). This is a sign that we have a potential to partner with various media houses for communication and marketing purposes”, said Vilakazi.

Conversation with Men programs will soon be rolled out in all provinces in South Africa.  Organising team has not yet confirmed the dates, venue and other logistical issues for future events in other provinces. All they were willing to confirm is that the following Conversation with Men will be held in Free State.

Remembering Biko: Not for the Sake of it

“Merely by describing yourself as black you have started on a road towards emancipation, you have committed yourself to fight against all forces that seek to use your blackness as a stamp that marks you out as a subservient being.”- Steve Biko

The month of September celebrates South African heritage, but also marks the remembrance day of a dynamic leader that stood for a culture that celebrates one’s identity and heritage with an understanding of one’s worth in society, Steve Bantu Biko.

Giving performing arts a different and meaningful definition, activator Solitude Mayedwa and the Poetics team took the streets of Guga Sthebe, Langa on an in-depth Black consciousness journey on Saturday, September 12, 2015.

The creative artists group: Poetics “Music not for the sake of it”, hosted the Langa community at an event that was in commemoration of the life and in remembrance of the death of Black Consciousness activist, Steve Biko.

Steve Biko was an anti-apartheid activist who then founded the Black consciousness movement.

The aim of the event was to inform and gather youth in the community of Langa and conscientise them about the life of this leader, what he stood for and to engage them on the issue of Biko’s relevance today as well as lessons that the SA youth can carry forward to fearlessly exercise their identity and move forward in building a mentally transformed post-apartheid society.

To start off and create a base for the audience, the audience was shown a video clip from Steve Biko’s interview on rare TV, where he stipulated his belief of an equitable society. “We believe that in our country there shall be no minority, there shall be no majority, there shall just be people, and those people shall have the same status before the law…” were some of Biko’s words. The interview was then used as a springboard to discuss the issue of black consciousness and what it meant for young people in society today.

The response from the audience was insightful, thought provoking and rather in depth. A number of issues came out from the discussion such as the fact that white supremacy is still relevant and at its peak in the country and how that affects the inferiority complex amongst black people, and that in order for Africans to love and believe in one race, there should be harmony with one’s own people. Africans need to be rooted in their identity and be in solidarity when addressing social injustices. “A race-less society is not easy. Colonialism was not based on hate, but it was based on the survival of one race over the other”, was one of the responses from the audience.

Activate! Change Driver and facilitator Nqaba Mpofu also gave insight on how Black Consciousness can be decoded. “We need to understand consciousness means one was asleep initially, so we should consider the things that have kept us in that position; historical catastrophes that have shaped our condition as blacks, then we will understand our conditions of being black as our own identity”, he said.

As part of the heritage month celebrations, local artists, some of which are part of the poetics group, were given a platform to perform. Artists like Zanzolo, Mdu and Thabiso Nkoana graced the audience with home-brewed music and poetry.

There was also a networking platform during the break sessions at the event. Activators – who came in numbers from Cape Town, Stellenbosch, Jo’burg and KwaZulu-Natal- were coming up with collaborative strategies to tell African stories and to uplift the economy through social entrepreneurship. Personal development coach and activator Thembinkosi Matika said “Some of the issues tackled today are things we know, we are aware, we just never act on it. We need to learn to trust each other and work together to uplift our own economy. I am for that, I do not believe in working alone when I have so many African brothers and sisters.  That is how we will get to realise and be ‘awake’ as black Africans.”

The event was impacting to community members too. Andisa Mdlalotye (21) from Langa said that this is what the community of Langa needed. “I learnt so much from the people that were talking here and I am motivated to make my mark as a young person now. Thank you, and I am looking forward to more of similar events from Poetics”.

Solitude is a 2015 Activator who is passionate about using creative arts to educate and inform young people. “What is saddening though, is the fact that we have to pay for spaces that were meant to be for our own development. We have people that are not from Langa using our public spaces for their own benefits”, he says.

To get in touch with poetics, you can like their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/PoeticsOfAfrica?fref=ts.

Press Release: Bringing the SDGs Home

The increasing and overlapping issues faced by youth globally today have resulted in a need for civil society to collaborate and take action for a collective cause. This need is particularly pertinent for organisations representing and working with young people in South Africa, a constituency which is regularly under-consulted in matters which directly affect them.

With the evident need on a global scale to humanize sustainable development, the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, ACTIVATE! Change Drivers and InkuluFreeheid have united behind a campaign, which highlights the need for the South African government and its UN representatives to have a progressive stance, particularly on the economic empowerment of youth within the post- 2015 development agenda.

The “Bringing the SDGs home” campaign commences as global leaders plan to congregate for the upcoming UN Summit, which will be held on 25-27 September 2015, to adopt the new SDGs. High on the priority list for this campaign is the need to advance the economic empowerment of youth within a global platform. 

This campaign convened a roundtable on 06 August 2015 discussion between youth organisations in the Western Cape. The following issues arose from the roundtable with respect to the SDGs agenda:

?     The new SDGs are comprehensive and practical with real potential to lead to meaningful transformation in the next fifteen years for marginalized groups such as youth. However, success will depend largely on the participation and engagement with a broad section of stakeholders across society.

?     Young people in particular play a crucial role in development yet too often their voices are left out of critical policy dialogues platforms and decision making around their own development.

?     Concerning youth and poverty alleviation, South Africa should prioritise interventions on skills development and addressing systematic barriers to productive employment and income generation activities. Collectively these issues have intertwined and formed an avalanche of challenges that continue to hinder the positive development for South Africa’s youth.

?     Thus, youth participation in the SDGs should be deepened to support the implementation of national strategies aimed towards youth poverty alleviation.

With active citizenry increasingly becoming important for inclusive socio-economic development, the “Bringing the SDGs Home” campaign calls on the South African government to create dialogue platforms to deepen the participation of young people in the SDGs process and to support poverty alleviation among youth.

In an effort to raise awareness and move the conversation forward, we will be organising a series of Twitter interviews and online discussions around key issues related to the SDGs and youth development. The first of these interviews will take place on Wednesday 9 September 2015, between 19:00 – 20:00. Follow @InkuluFreeHeid, @_IJR_ and @ActivateZA for more details and to submit questions.


—Ends—  

 

For media enquiries and interviews please contact: 

IJR: Ayanda Nyoka – anyoka@ijr.org.za 

ACTIVATE!: Nelisa Nqgulana – nelisa@localhost 

InkuluFreeheid: Kgotsi Chikane – chikaner@gmail.com

Women in Leadership with Ahmed Kathrada

“The world has many capable female leaders that can take this country forward.”

Those were the words of the revered political stalwart, Dr Ahmed Mohamed Kathrada during an exclusive dialogue with a bunch of young female social change drivers at his house in Killarney, Johannesburg on Thursday, 27August 2015.

The gathering was organised by Apple Communications founder and Activate Leadership Inland trainer, Tebogo Suping. This innovative event was also covered by one of South Africa’s prominent talk radio sstation, SAFM.

The 86-year-old former Nelson Mandela friend and political advisor relished an opportunity to share his few stories about his life and explicitly confront some dominant patriarchal issues that most women are facing.

The modest leader dismissed all personal leadership accolades but he constantly reiterated that all he had achieved was because of the collective that was driving the mandate to free South African and ultimately serve them well when he and his peers were in power.

Some of the issues that he constantly stressed were;  the role of women in South African liberation, importance of education for young leaders, youth participation in decision making processes and the desperate need for young people to unite in order to move the country forward, just to mention a few.

The history of women leadership

“I think we need to really look deep down ourselves and confront a few critical issues as a country. Those include but not limited to giving women more room to assume leadership roles. Women have always played a serious leadership role in our country’s struggle. They are still doing so. Public Protector (Thuli Madonsela) is a typical example of that. It is a pity that other parts of society choose not to speak in glowing terms about women leaders or still don’t believe in women. It is absolutely crucial for all voices and stories more especially women to be heard. There are many women formations out there. They have to lead that campaign.”

Youth must participate in decision making processes

“Young people are the majority in South Africa.  It is very important that the youth is always involved in every decision making. Of course there are power hungry people who will try to make that difficult but that does not mean young people must just assume spectator roles and watch adults take decisions that affect their lives. Today we are talking about a country with skills shortage. Why is that the case while we have young educated people in this country? I wish all competent young people like you can start now, roll up your sleeves and be prepared to serve this country.”

Sometimes youth behaviour is disappointing

“I really understand the youth’s frustration with some other issues that are not going well in this country. So I don’t condemn or recommend what young people are doing but mine is to just suggest that young people must follow the right channels. Burning down clinics, schools, libraries and other government establishments does come as counter revolution for me.  I do think that there are a number of accessible none violence avenues of addressing our concerns”

Unity is key

His wish to young people is that they know that freedom did not come for free and so they must always enjoy that responsibly and be more united in their quest to take South Africa. “I am very happy that what we got, what we sacrificed our families for lives. I wish young people will understand the value of our democracy. I have noticed that 90% of young peoples’ aspirations are the same but their major problem is that they are competing against each other for power or position instead of uniting” said Dr Kathrada.  

In conclusion, Dr Kathrada applauded social change drivers’ level of curiosity for their history in willingness to acquire correct leadership skills. “Thank you very for listening to me. I am impressed by your optimism and patriotism.  South Africa is indeed in good hands”, applauded Dr Kathrada

The ladies then closed the exclusive gathering by handing over a prestigious gift before taking a group photo with legendary leader.

Gauteng Connector, Bongi Ndlovukazi said the dialogue with Dr Kathrada renewed her social change driving spirit. Ndlovukazi vowed to continue using modern resources available to her to fulfil the wishes and the legacy of fallen female leaders such as, Lilian Ngoyi, Albertina Sisulu, Helen Joseph etc. “I enjoyed every second of the dialogue with Dr Kathrada. He has a very humbled infectious character that makes it easy to encourage others to excel in what they do. For me the most amazing part is that he doesn’t want to be referred to as the giant of struggle but to refer to some of his comrades like Mosses Kotane as “giants of our struggle”. I was also amazed when he said “the only regrets that he never took notes from Walter Sisulu all the years together. That was very profound” said Ndlovukazi.

Other activators such as Matshepo Moatshe, Nelishka Sighn, Olerato Serojane, Rachel Modise and Nathacia Olivia shared the same sentiments as Ndlovukazi. They all praised Dr Kathrada’s humble character and willingness to serve people of South Africa. The young mbokodos also thanked Suping for organising the dialogue with Dr Kathrada.

Event organizer, Tebogo Suping used the dialogue as one of her tools to open a platform for emerging young leaders to interact. “I organised this event because I feel it is imperative that in our quest for change (as youth) to keep the inter-generational conversation open as there are many lessons to be learned on both sides (youth and elders). I think it is important that we focus on what unites as both young and old, instead of what separates us in moving South Africa forward”, said Suping.

Suping couldn’t reveal which leader she will host next. “I am constantly on the look out to engage leaders across all levels and age groups who work selflessly and collaboratively towards developing themselves and others”, she said.

Kick a Ball for Rural Communities

In a bid to build social cohesion, Gauteng and North West based activators hosted inaugural community empowerment event through sports, Kick a Ball for Rural Communities in Hammanskraal North West  on the 15th of August.

The well attended tournament saw eight male football teams, three female football teams and five female netball teams, table tennis and chess players from Moretele Local Municipality villages like Carousel View, Maubane and Bosplaaseast.

Kick A Ball For Rural Communities is a one of many projects of youth in sports, Foundation of Sports Alchemy (FOSA) which is led by two Activators, multiple youth empowerment program facilitator, David Lekgwathi from East Rand in Johannesburg and social entrepreneur and Activate from Eersterut in Pretoria. Donahue Adams

FOSA’s major objectives of the event are to use sports as a tool to help the community to confront social normalized abusive patriarch norms in the community. Most importantly, the organizers’ hope that the tournament will accelerate youth structures relations with government, business and civil society organizations in these fields education, entrepreneurship, leadership, sport, innovation and job creation sectors of South Africa.

Lekgwathi said they decided to use sports as a tool to empower and unite rural communities. They collaborated with other activator led organizers Liberty Youth Movement and Network of Entrepreneurs Readers and Designers in Africa (NERD Africa) and the Adams’ family generosity. ”Foundation of Sports Alchemy could not have made it this far without Marcel Adams Memorial and Activate support.  Words can never ever clearly describe our gratitude to all those organization and individuals. I pray that all minded Africans throughout can continue rewriting motherland’s story.”  

He went on to say looking back at the event “I am very happy with the outcome of this event because we use sport as a single unifying factor that has emerged, uniting nations behind the various sporting codes and events, despite the barriers which often divide them and we also invest in our youth and in our communities, we are building a solid foundation for future leaders by empowering and uniting them through sport. This is just a beginning of many of great things to come. I think it is also important to highlight that other stakeholders are welcomed to join us in our quest of unleashing youth excellence in so called disadvantaged neglected areas of this country.”

The tournament activities included football, netball board games, chess and the dialogue. All these activities aim was to give the community a chance to raise their concerns about issues that affect young people in their communities and together find solutions for those problems.

During the dialogue, (which was focusing on how can the community members use sports as tool for change and transformation) community members highlighted substance abuse, illiteracy, youth despondence, unemployment, alcohol abuse, crime, gambling, teenage pregnancy, school drop outs, and lack of sport facilities and some the serious youth challenges in the community.  

Some of the prominent individuals who attended the event include community scholar John Mkwebo, include Amatuks manager, Jarred Ace retired football legend Charles Adams just to mention the few.

Speaking on behalf of the community, young scholar and community leader, John Mkwebo urged his community members to continue being advocates and on the ground social change at all their respective spheres of life.  He said “Our sudden companionability participation in this initiative by Liberty Life Movement, Marcel Adams Memorial.  Activate Leadership, FOSA Pretoria based Bakwena Chief Executive Officer, Reginald Feinstein and NERD Africa led event has shown us that our involvement in sports activities can easily deal or prevent all our challenges as community.”

At the end of the event, the excited Carousel View based Activator and Liberty Youth Movement director, Thabang Phokungwana thanked Activate Leadership for creating a platform for positive minded young people throughout to work together in creating a better society for all. “I am very happy with everything. The event went very well. I would like to thank all Activators like Don (Adams), Dave (Lekgwathi), Duncan (Mfamadi) and Tumelo (Khoza) who made sure all this happen. Now Indeed I agree that there is power in unity. All these selfless young leaders have proved that. Most importantly I think I have to thank Activate Leadership for linking young leaders up. It is  through Activate that today burning youth issues in my community are addressed by youth themselves and all this was led by us as Activators from different provinces”

A reputable bank has already shown interest in supporting the tournament in future.

Dozens of delighted community members vowed to make sure that next year’s’ Kick a Ball for Rural Communities (13th August 2016.) will be bigger and better.