The Mighty African Goddess

By Kumkani Matosa

The mighty Afrikan Goddess. ‘’ Dipped in chocolate, bronzed in elegance, enameled with grace, toasted with beauty…’’ Thixo wam she’s an Afrikan woman. A famous African proverb says, when you educate a man, you educate an individual when you educate a woman you educate a generation.

“Whatever you give a woman, she’s going to multiply. If you give her sperm, she’ll give you a baby. If you give her a house, she’ll give you a home. If you give her groceries, she’ll give you a meal. If you give her a smile, she’ll give you her heart. She multiplies and enlarges what is given to her…”

“The womb of a woman is the most sacred place on earth. When you believe this, when you know this, you cannot allow unqualified men inside’’

Undeniably, a woman is immeasurably valuable and should be protected everlastingly. There is no justification non-what so ever for her suffering. Under no circumstances should she be mistreated. Unfortunately, the Afrikan woman has not enjoyed protection from the Afrikan man for over 400 years. Afrikan men were her last line of defence when colonialist come to our shores centuries ago and we failed to defend her then, we continue to fail in protecting Afrikan woman to this very day.

I am so ashamed and extremely hurt by this reality. How can an entire race of males fail to protect its females while other races have been able to do so?

The Arab man has been able to protect his Queen, the European man has been able to protect his Queen and so too has the Asian man. The Afrikan man has not been able to protect his Queen even to this day when the system has given us a bit of allowance to do so. We continue to show malice towards this wonderful creation God made for us Afrikan men. Most shockingly, and I don’t think every Afrikan man realises the fact that the worst victim of colonialism and of the injustice our race suffers currently- is the Afrikan woman.

I do not think we’ve truly loved our women whilst being unable to protect them. Yes, Afrikan women are magical under any circumstances!!! But those latent hidden powers she possesses are best exhibited when she is at peace and assured of protection. That which is amazing we’ve seen her do over the past centuries despite her being oppressed is nothing… the world has not seen an Afrikan woman at her very best…

The Afrikan man’s failure to protect the Afrikan Queen has subjected her to many bad things because of her vulnerability- including shocking medical experiments in the past, her beautiful body was used as a tool in the advancement of the medical profession, from physicians learning anatomy using your amazingly contoured body without consent, to gruesome surgical amputations. It pains me once more, to live with the reality that before many things became standard medicine, it first had to be experimented on African women. Many Afrikan woman today are being trafficked for sex slavery and we, as a race of Afrikan men, cannot prevent that from happening.

Females are the greatest creation on earth, why is the African woman the worst sufferer in the history of mankind when she is part of the greatest creation on earth? Our creator ordained Afrikan man to protect the Afrikan woman, Afrikan men are part of the arsenal she has been equipped with to face the journey of life. Our creator put confidence in us as men to protect our woman, let us not urinate on that. NO INSTITUTION CAN PROTECT THE AFRIKAN WOMAN AS BEST AS THE AFRIKAN MAN CAN, when he chooses to do so.  We do not need a policy written for us Afrikan men to recognise the significance and imperative of protecting our Afrikan woman. It is a natural law that can never be legislated.

“Land or death” has been proclaimed publicly by some. Before we die for the land we have got to be prepared to die protecting our Afrikan woman. Death for African woman before land!!!

We must be actively involved in the cause of protecting Afrikan woman and not merely be sympathetic to the cause on woman’s month and Mother’s Day. Protecting Afrikan woman requires, in my opinion- radicals, there’s no room for semi-radicals if we are to adequately protect our Queen.

Our strong arms are meant to hold and make her feel secured- not hit her, our muscular chests and shoulders are meant for her to find comfort in laying her head on.

We Afrikan men should stop defying logic with our inability to protect Afrikan woman. We can all begin by respecting and honouring the Afrikan woman’s significance in our homes and societies. How can a human being express anger or irritation using a reproductive organ that delivered him to earth? We need to stop the vulgarity and disdain towards the precious female organ which we were all conceived and brought to earth through. Above all she certainly is not a female dog. Has never been and will never be!!!

Most importantly, we Afrikan men need to assume responsibility, unconditionally, of the role God has put us on earth to fulfil.

Kumkanikazi yethu, you gave birth to Afrika, you nurtured and protected us, you are half the world, we are nothing without you. You have endured so many awful sacrifices for Afrika and still cohered alongside us. Many of us often use Kwame Nkrumah’s words ‘’ I was not born in Africa, Africa was born in me” Afrika was first born in you, Afrikan Goddess, before your offspring. Your suffering on earth is not eternal. It will come to an end one day, and only us Afrikan men can end your suffering. In the words of Jesse Williams ‘’for you, we can and will be strong’’.  It is not all doom and gloom, there are many soldiers out there who have honoured the duty to love and protect you.

Build a home and institutions with Afrikan women!!!

Photo credit: Home of African Literature

 

Luleka’s Super Power is Being A Realist

Name: Luleka Mhlanzi

Province: KZN

Facebook: Luleka Mhlanzi Ndlangisa

Instagram: lulekamhlanzi

 

What is the essence of being a woman to you?

It is it understanding that my breathing is beyond gender, beyond societal stereotypes. I am what I create of myself.

What is your super power?

Realism, also I do not even begin to be judgmental.

What words would you use to describe yourself?

I am god, a mother, writer, performer, feminist and all the other nice words.

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

As much as I understand that women must be celebrated at all times however I think Women’s Month is necessary as a birth mark reminder of women, just like birth months.

They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

The problem is “behind”. Why would the strength of a woman be put behind?

How do you think society perceives women?

Society is the worst, women are tokens, not human enough.

How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

I am a feminist and realist every day, in my life and encounters with people.

What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

The role of a woman is to BE. Then it is to empower as many women as possible into contributing to our country’s economy and state of spirituality.

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

By educating as many women as possible about patriarchy and feminism, by unlearning all stereotypes dehumanising women, and by taking charge and responsibility for my future without dependence.

In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

It would be a great turning point for women-recognition. It will teach society that a woman can be in power without threatening the fragile masculinity of men.

Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

You are on the right track.

 

 

Blessing, A goal-oriented leader

Name: Blessing Mutiti

Province: USA

Facebook: @ Africanmythbuster

Twitter handle:@blessmutiti

Instagram: Africanmythbuster

 

What is the essence of being a woman to you?

Knowing my worth before anyone else defines it for me and setting goals endlessly

What is your super power?

Resilience, knowing that I’m worthy and exercising a strong sense of self-esteem.

What words would you use to describe yourself?

Goal-oriented, leader, resilient, ambitious and passionate

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

No, womanhood should be recognised every day and one month put aside is kind of limiting in itself. I wish for a world where being a woman is not perceived as a need for special tolerance but equally significant as the other genders.

They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

Women have supported men who have consolidated their positions in leadership because naturally women are incubators, they are resilient, they nurture and they motivate. Without women, there will be chaos and men will not be the leaders they are.

How do you think society perceives women?

In a very subjective way, very demeaning mostly. Unfortunately even so for the president of the most powerful country in the world, USA.

How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

Setting goals consistently and faithfully following through. Not allowing anybody to dictate my pace, my worth and believing every day that I can do more; the sky is not the limit.

What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

There has never been a better time for women to be involved at every level they want to be; be in academics, politics or economics. They are gifted because they can do this from bottom up starting with the family level.

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

I am an environmentalist, activist and a sound academic. I will be counted among men with PHD’s in the science field. And I am working on passing on the legacy by supporting young girls to consolidate their interest in science and environmentalism.

Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Do not be hasty, take time and develop your skills. You are set apart because you are unique and do not conform dare to be different.

Violet Polelo Selwana’s super power is self-motivation

Name: Violet Polelo Selwana

Province: Eastern Cape

Facebook: Polelo Violet Selwana

Twitter handle:@Violet­_pvs

Instagram: violet_selwana

What is the essence of being a woman to you?

The essence of being a women lies in her, faith, caring heart, kindness, and wisdom. Being a women is a blessing and a gift from God. A woman is fearless, she is the source of love, compassion, sincerity, sacrificing patience and attention.

What is your super power?

Self-Motivation and My God are my super powers. In hard/good times I pray to God to strengthen me , so I can be able to stand strong and motivate myself to keep going in life.

What words would you use to describe yourself?

Generous, Active, Powerful, Cooperative, Cheerful, Patient and Goal-Orientated.

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

Yes, I totally relate to Women’s. In remembrance of 9 August 1956, many woman went through tough time, fighting against unjust laws enforced on woman in South Africa. Many things were achieved in the power of women’s unity and strength. So this is a special month to remind woman the opportunity to celebrate women’s achievements and the important role that women of all races and religions have played and continue to play in South African society.

They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

Yes. According to Science, it has been proven that women grow and mature faster than man. So in most cases my brothers will always want advice from my mother and us sisters to help in their decision making, not that they cannot decide on things but they need women support and wisdom to get things going for them. Practically, men will leave us but will find a women still remaining strong for them, not giving up, waiting with a beautiful smile on their faces. Looking at my mother support towards father proves a lot that women are not so easily broken by Circumstances in life.

How do you think society perceives women?

In Today’s time women are living a tough life. As the society perceive them as weak, and are used in all sorts of bad things, like they being abused, raped and discriminated against the gender roles. In most cases women in order to be taken serious in leadership positions or be in power, they have to suffer and always fight to prove themselves that they are capable, even when they meet all requirements are still to be critised to their strengths and abilities.

How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

Change in the sense of changing the community in building a better society, to show commitment I am engaged with BEAUTY I OWN, is a non- profit organisation that mainly focuses on empowering and inspiring young women thus allowing them to acknowledge the power they possess and the beauty that lies within them. In this case “beauty” is referred to as a single word covering knowledge, behaviour, physical appearance as well as attitude. As a way of achieving this, the organisation aims at playing a tremendous role and helping create change in today’s society, improving mind-sets, self-esteem and helping build confidence. The Beauty I Own has been in operation since 2014. We have grown so much that we have branches in Johannesburg, Grahamstown and Port Elizabeth. Behind The Beauty I Own, is its principle of giving back to the community and what better way to impact a community than to target the young people hence our events are subject to take place in communities we working. We offer motivational speaking, empowerment and help out in providing and asking for donations sanitary to young women.

What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

It is to educate and guide each other. For example, women who are successful can come back and share experiences, information and resources, to other women so that they can grow and build a better change in developing the country.

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

I believe in equality and social justice, so gender roles sometimes are problematic because they create a division amongst the nation as, men now see themselves as superiors and ignore women capabilities in power. However, as a women my role will be to keep embracing the sense of dignity, respect, not allow to be undermined, strive for good leadership and continue to fight the system in regards to gender equality.

In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

Reference from above with all those qualities of women being strong, making things to happen, working hard, warmth and good leadership skills etc., I believe they will try to make sure that people in the country are happy and also improve in changing the social perspective of the country. In general the country will still be operating fine just, the good thing of it will be that women will be highly respected and their dignity.

Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Love yourself, Never stop dreaming, believe in your dreams and ambitions, always keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Do not forget WHO YOU ARE, do not shut out your inner voice it is Very Powerful and lastly always tell yourself you are Beautiful do not wait for others to tell. Everything starts with you because it’s all about you and your life.

 

 

Young women in conversation

Minister of Communications joins young women leaders in a conversation aimed opening opportunities for their representation in media

Minister of Communications, Ayanda Dlodlo has confirmed her presence and participation for the upcoming Activate! Change Drivers brunch that is going to be held on August 28th 2017 in Johannesburg. Activate! is a network that connects young people and equips them with the necessary knowledge and skills to thrive in their respective efforts.

The envisioned outcome of the gathering is to encourage critical partnerships between rural women and existing structures. Conversation participants will also be contributing towards the recently-launched, Activate! Radio; a podcast show that aims to capture uncensored youth opinions across the country using WhatsApp and young journalists working in remote areas.

The motivation behind the engagement is to provide young women from various rural areas throughout the country to be further empowered with the knowledge of identifying existing structures and facilities that will enable them to grow existing programmes ranging from after school homework workshops to sustainable energy initiatives that directly serve a pocket of South Africans that are perceived to be out of reach.

The representation of rural women in media will be at the heart of the conversation. The widening of representation of young women driving change in South Africa has created an evident divide between young women from urban communities versus female youth leaders who are advocating and driving change in rural communities.

The conversation with the Minister will also explore the representation of young rural women in media and how that influences the overall perception and treatments of these future community leaders.

“Access to critical support between pro-active young citizens and South Africa’s development custodians such as; Brand SA, MDDA and GCIS is important to develop and  nourish in order to ensure that youths committed to change are well-equipped to guarantee the success of their programmes and efforts,” says Nelisa Ngqulana, Media and Partnerships Manager at Activate! Change Drivers.

Throughout the years, ACTIVATE! has developed key strategic relationships with media in order  to create multiple adequate representation opportunities in the media for rural women. Through its successful and currently running partnership with Prime Media and Lead SA, the network has been able to provide multi-faceted avenues of representation and exposure for young rural female leaders.

Consisting of a network of over 2000 young leaders from both urban and rural areas, Activate! Change Drivers prioritizes emphasizing and celebrating the power of active citizenry amongst young leaders who are actively driving positive change in their communities.

ENDS

About ACTIVATE! Change Drivers

 ACTIVATE! Change Drivers is a Cape Town based youth organization that is focused on developing young people in South Africa to be future leaders. The network is made up of more than 2 000 youth who are innovating in their communities. ACTIVATE! encourages active citizenry and has had many successful engagement events within the rural areas between local government and communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activator Khangwelo Mulovhedzi’s super power is strength

Name: Khangwelo Mulovhedzi

Province:Limpopo

Facebook:Glam Kay

Twitter handle:

Instagram: khangwelomulovhedzi 

What is the essence of being a woman to you?

Being able to give birth and raise a leader means that I am a leader by nature. I should stand still and be strong and shield all my beliefs and my value. With hope to be groomed by people who know leadership skills.

What is your super power?

Standing strong even if there are storms in my way. Sometimes I fall but I’m able to dust  myself off and continue

What words would you use to describe yourself?

Goal oriented and courageous

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

Yes….. Because back then there were woman who were prepared to take on action in the struggle and I believe that I can also be that woman who is not afraid of change

They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

Yes because if there were no women, there was not going to be motivation and someone who channels the behaviour.

How do you think society perceives women?

As some weak creature that needs protection and shielding from men. Of which I strongly disagree.

How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

I have passion and charisma inside me that makes me yearn to be groomed by the female leaders and be able to be a well-rounded finished product. To advocate on behalf of woman

What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

Be that person who is fearless of change. Who can stand her ground without leaning on a man? But rather seek advice were necessary

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

Empowering other females that they can be better and not be side-lined. They should stand up and raise their voices.

In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

Colourful, just like its national flag. Because I wouldn’t just document ideas but rather focus on the implementation part of it.

Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Be passionate and dedicated to instill change in people.

 

 

A! Gender Based Violence Imbizo

On 24th August; ACTIVATE! Change Drivers in conjunction with Africa Unite and the Institute of Justice and Reconciliation will convene the A! Gender Based Violence Imbizo aimed at engaging the views of social activists, thought-leaders, experts and practitioners within the sexual health and gender rights sector on effective community-based interventions to address the challenge of gender-based violence in South Africa.

Furthermore, the Imbizo will endeavour to explore opportunities for multi-sector collaborations aimed at addressing the stated challenge of gender based violence.

The South African constitution guarantees equality for women and the LGBTQIA+ community as well as the right to freedom from violence, and access to socio-economic rights such as housing, land, health and fair labour practices. Notwithstanding, the reality that South Africa has some of the most progressive legislation in the whole of Africa; the country continues to experience horrendous gender-based crimes.

While it is commonly accepted that men generally constitute the majority of perpetrators of violence against women, the LGBTQIA+ commonly, men are also victims of violence as experienced within communities across South Africa. While little has been documented regarding men on men violence in South Africa, men are also affected by violence given that the country is generally characterised by high levels of crime and violence.

The various stakeholders expected to contribute to the conversation include the Commission on Gender Equality, Inclusive and Affirming Ministries, Gender Works, the Khayelitsha Peacebuilding Team and STEPS, to name a few.

The month of August marks National Women’s Month in South Africa and essentially sets out to commemorate the 20 000 brave women who marched to the Union Buildings in Pretoria in 1956  protesting the apartheid pass laws being extended to black women. Moreover, Women’s Month endeavors to draw attention to the challenges facing women in society in general, including the pressing challenge of gender-based violence.

In light of the above-stated, it would be correct to argue that there is a dire need for communities across South Africa to be empowered to contribute towards enhancing effective community based responses to the challenge of gender based violence.

The A! Gender Based Violence Imbizo will be coordinated under the following arrangements:

Date: 24 August 2017

Venue: Africa Unite

6 Spin Street

Cape Town

Join the conversation and share your perspectives and views on how various sectors of society including government, the private sector, civic society and communities across South Africa can all work towards finding solutions to the challenge of gender based violence.

Ends

Notes to the editor:

ACTIVATE! is a network of young leaders equipped to drive change for the public good across South Africa. Connecting youth who have the skills, sense of self and spark to address tough challenges and initiate innovative and creative solutions that can reshape our society.

 

For more information on the A! Imbizo:

Events Co-ordinator : Rammolotsi Sothoane

Call: 082 8781 263

Email: rammolotsis@localhost

ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Facebook : Activate Change Drivers

Twitter : @ActivateZA

Instagram: activate_za

For media related queries, please contact:

Communications/P.R:

Zilungile Athenjwa Zimela

Cell: 078 255 3378

 CELEBRATING EVERYDAY WOMEN WHO GO UNRECOGNISED

Women of the ACTIVATE! Change Drivers Network will tomorrow pay homage to the Women’s March of 1956 where more than 20 000 women of all races and backgrounds came together to march against the injustices that women faced. Today, women of South Africa face terrifying reality of violence linked to various reasons that are also connected to their gender.

The ACTIVATE! Change Drivers Network has dedicated itself to conduct robust discussions that question and challenge why such injustices continue to this day. Through dialogues of this nature we hope to host honest inter-generational discussions to understand what role women play in contributing to a patriarchal society and to gender-based violence.

At the heart and back-end of the dialogues is the insatiable desire to celebrate women who go unrecognised yet are working every day to rebuild South Africa from the roots up. The dialogue will see the attendees signing a pledge that denotes the ongoing commitment to continue the discussions and sisterhood support circles in communities to provide safe spaces where women of all ages can empower themselves so that they can reach their best potential.

The main aim of the event is to ensure that women do not grow weary of their everyday work of being nurturers, leaders and strong pillars of support.

 

When: 25 August 2017

Where: Constitutional Hill

Time: 10am-15:00

Ends

For more information on the event contact:

Event Coordinator: Bongi Ndlovu – 079 270 3536

Project Manager: Tebogo Supping –  076 622 8564

Notes to the editor:

About ACTIVATE!:

ACTIVATE! is a network of young leaders equipped to drive change for the public good across South Africa. Connecting youth who have the skills, sense of self and spark to address tough challenges and initiate innovative and creative solutions that can reshape our society.

 

For media related queries, please contact:

Communications/ P.R:

Zilungile Athenjwa Zimela

078 255 3378

zilungile@localhost

 

On social media:

Twitter: @ActivateZA

Facebook: ACTIVATE! Change Drivers

Website: www.activateleadership.co.za

Instagram: Activate_za

Young female entrepreneur fighting for her start-up

As part of our digital youth supplement, Uncensored Voices, Activator Sebina Ramaseli looks at women in entrepreneurship and why it is difficult for them to thrive.

The small business sector contributes to job creation and economic growth. However, South Africa’s 2016 National Small Business Survey found that 76% of businesses under 5 years cited access to funding as their biggest obstacle to growth.

With all this said, being a woman in business is even harder. Female entrepreneurs face more obstacles than their male counterparts. Even though women bring unique qualities to entrepreneurship, it’s still difficult for them to thrive. Entrepreneurship is often glorified on social media. You see a business owner flaunting their success and you are immediately hooked and impressed. No one tells you about the sleepless nights. No one tells you about late payments from clients while you have to pay your employees. No one tells you about the sacrifices you have to make and the relationships you lose along the way.

On top of the many sacrifices you make and the efforts you put in, not many take you seriously as a young woman in business.

I remember when I first told people about my love for the building industry and how I have dreams of becoming a contractor “Why don’t you do female jobs?” “That’s a man’s world” were some of the responses I got. Your self-confidence gets tested on so many levels you end up doubting yourself. Next thing you come across people that want to exploit you. They offer you work in exchange for sexual favours…”bula dirope” policy (open thigh policy)
Many women give up on their dreams when it comes to business because of the many attacks on their values and capabilities.

Through it all you need to be confident in who you are and be yourself no matter what. To survive as a young woman in business, you need to be true to who you are and stand by your values. You need a lot of self-confidence, self-motivation and self-love to keep you going. Most importantly, surround yourself with like minded people, people that want to see you grow. I have fallen so many times in business, made a lot of mistakes by trusting the wrong people but I still stand because I strongly believe in myself. The support my family gives me and our local government in training has helped me a lot in boosting my confidence.

If women are given the opportunity to grow as fast in business as their male counterparts, women would invest most of their income into their families and communities. Putting more wealth in the hands of women could have a positive effect on the country’s economy. I strongly believe that “If you want to change the world, love and empower a woman!”

Shaiyah’s Super Power is Financial Wisdom

Name: Shaiyah Luthuli

Province: KwaZulu Natal

Facebook: Shaiyah Eshet Yahav (Vegan Ekasi is my page)

Twitter handle: @queen_shaiyah (@veganekasi)

Instagram: @queen_shaiyah (@veganekasi)

 

What is the essence of being a woman to you?

A woman is a life giver in all aspects. We bring life and order in everything we touch. Without women, there is no continuation or balance.

What is your super power?

My “Financial wisdom” so says my husband.

What words would you use to describe yourself?

Too awesome for words! Lol, just kidding. I think explorer, peaceful, truthful and righteous best describe me.

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

I relate to women’s month because 09 August 1956 demonstrated the power of our feminine strength and the significance of this power in the revolution and nation building.

They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

Yes I relate to this because it’s true. There’s a line in a song that says: “I’m a movement by myself but I’m a force when we’re together.” It goes to testify that women have the natural ability to take men from one level to their highest level. Even the Bible says in Genesis 2:18 “And the Lord God said, it is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him and help meet for him.” Man later testifies of the greatness of being with his woman on Genesis 2:23 when he says: “This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh.” This goes to show that originally men and women were created to be one, equal, walking side by side (not one behind the other) and working together to fulfill the will of the Creator, it’s only their roles that differed.

How do you think society perceives women?

It would depend on which society we are talking about. But generally, nowadays, women are objectified and seen as sex symbols. We see this perception mostly on TV where half naked women are used to sell everything from entertainment to cars and cigarettes. It is unfortunate that some women also perceive themselves this way.

How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

I am #CommittedToChange by sharing my passion and knowledge by establishing a movement (Vegan eKasi) that aims to increase awareness about the plant-based diet and healthy living in disadvantaged communities. My mission is to introduce and encourage healthier habits, both dietary and socially.

What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

Women bring balance and order. They are teachers and nurturers of the nation. They make sure that things get done and that promises are fulfilled.

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

I fulfill my role by staying true to myself and what I was created to be. A woman. I don’t diminish my feminine power by trying to be a man or comparing myself to one. I’m a builder. A firm believer of oneness and harmony between the two genders, that they complement each other rather than being “opposite sexes”. This attitude has resulted in me being seen as a partner and an integral part in decision making in the spaces I occupy.

In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

SA would be a more orderly country. It would be more balanced because women know how to distribute resources according to need not greed.

Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

First things first I would say YOU ARE BEAUTIFUL! Don’t try to fit in. You don’t have to. It’s okay to be different.

Courage is Khutso Mmethi’s Super Power

Name: Khutso Mmethi

Province: Limpopo

Facebook: Khutso Kattitude Mmethi

Instagram:@Kaytitude

 

What is the essence of being a woman to you?

Being of great articulate character. Standing bold and brave for being human before everything.

What is your super power?

My sense of possessing courage to the next person

What words would you use to describe yourself?

Intellect, African, Queen, ambitious, dreamer, lover of life.

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

I do relate to it. It is with great honour to rise and celebrate the struggles, strengths, achievement and success of women. We have been deprived of our freedom for so long. Now we take charge of individuals we are.

They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

Yes because as women, there are certain attributes we are born with to view situations and bring light to ideas. As women, we have a nurturing essence. I always say when you are a woman, feed a man’s ego by moulding it and possessing it where it best suits

How do you think society perceives women?

Society sees women as weak, dependent, confused, not having focus or vision. We are seen to be the feeders of homes, the carers of children and the sitters of homes.

How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

I always affirm my character wherever I go.

What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

We play a huge role because we see beyond challenges, we see beyond failure, and we have strength to bear whatever change that comes to us.

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

It’s a tough one because I always have to fight to be head.

In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

Wow! Peaceful, progressive and eager to achieve more.

Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Be a woman of dignity, be a woman of morals, love yourself and always see the best of you in everything you do.

Gabaiphiwe Makgaka’s Super Power Is Her Voice

Name: Gabaiphiwe Makgaka

Province: North West

Facebook: Gabaiphiwe Makgaka

Twitter handle: @soulsista63

Instagram:@abaphiwemotha

 

What is the essence of being a woman to you?

The essence of being a woman, is being a woman, a mother of the nation, being able to nurture your fruits to full bloom.

What is your super power?

My super power is my voice; when I talk they listen.

What words would you use to describe yourself?

Independent, strong, loving and caring.

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

YES I do. I am a woman and we go through a lot and we still hold it down. The women who all took a stand in 1956 were not just doing it for themselves, they showed the world that we are strong and for that this month means a lot to me as a woman.

They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

Yes it does, if that woman is not a mother, she is a wife or sister.

How do you think society perceives women?

Society perceives women as weak and useless and that they talk too much.

How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

I am committed to change by being a role model to the upcoming generation, help them achieve more than what I did at their age and be able to stand for what they believe in and what is right.

What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

The role of a woman in developing a country is educating the nation and making sure that the country is in good standing, support and encourage the leader to do what is right at all times.

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

It’s simple, I want to be a woman not just a woman but a woman with a voice, not just a voice but a strong voice.

In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

Independent country with a better looking future. Yes, it might not be perfect but it will be one of the best countries in the world.

Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

It’s okay to make mistakes. Just remember to learn from them and don’t be too quick to make decisions that will change your life. Learn and learn from everything that you do.

 

 

The woman I met yesterday

By: Gladys Nomvuyo Sebeko

LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT THE WOMAN I MET YESTERDAY

She had a smile of a queen and the breath of a princess

Her face was like an ocean with hair like the sunset

Her body so perfect like the clear blue sky

LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT THE WOMAN I MET YESTERDAY

She had strong but gentle hands with a warm touch

With athletic legs covered in olive oil

Her eyes so bright they made the room shine

LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT THE WOMAN I MET YESTERDAY

Her face told a story of a thousand years

And her laugh, shed tears of sorrow

Her arms looked like they could carry a village

LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT THE WOMAN I MET YESTERDAY

Her cheeks where full of pain, her lips were full of fear

Her hands were full of anger, her eyes had no soul

And her legs had no strength

LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT THE WOMAN I MET YESTERDAY

She wanted to talk but was told to listen

She wanted to cry but was told that crying is a sign of weakness

Her legs wanted to run but she was told that a WOMAN must not run away, but fight till the end.

YESTERDAY I MET A MODERN DAY WOMAN.

 

 

Well since it is August, care for a female president? No!!

By Kay-Dee Mashile

Happy women’s month to all the ladies of South Africa! This month is not only to commemorate the women who made it possible for today’s women to have voices that are loud enough to write articles such as this, but to also acknowledge the women who fight oppression and suppression on a daily basis but still find a way to wake up each day and make a difference in society. I salute you, malibongwe igama lenu makhosikazi amahle! In addition to this, Women’s Month also forces us to go back to the drawing board and reflect on how far South African women have come and how far we are yet to go to achieve optimal freedom and emancipation for all South African women. To this effect, the Honourable Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma states that, ‘If WE elect a female President…’ (hint hint) ‘… WE can look to Her…’ (so much modesty!) ‘… to empower and fast track women’s emancipation.’ which is actually true, in theory.

Well, if we were to look at her resume, Dr Dlamini Zuma, who is in fact a qualified medical Doctor, looks like the perfect candidate for “us” to elect. Having had studied her BSc in Zoology and Botany from 1971 at the University of Zululand and obtained her Medical Degree in 1978 from the University of Bristol in the UK, Dr Dlamini Zuma certainly made an effort to make it regardless of the impossible laws of the time. To her advantage, her expertise opened the door for her to become the first black female Minister of Health in the years 1994 to 1999. After which she served for two terms as Minister of Foreign Affairs between the years 1999 and 2009. And off to the Department of Home Affairs she went from 2009 until 2012 when she was appointed as the first female Chairperson of the African Union Commission (AUC). She served in the AUC until March 2017. Thereafter, she returned to South African politics to run for Presidency in the ANC. Impressive resume indeed! The irony of this article, however, is not to help the Honourable Dr with her Presidential campaign, but rather to express my opinion on why she is not the “female President” that this country needs.

While Dr Dlamini Zuma has had ample opportunities and positions to ensure that women are protected and, as she says a female President will see to it that women are, emancipated. It is said that charity begins at home, so it was supposed to be during her various terms in parliament that she proved herself capable of becoming the President of the country. As she puts it, ‘If we…’ (women) ‘… can run our homes, we can run the country.’ This comparison may be due to the fact that she has been spending a lot of time in church as it testifies to the scripture that reads, “He that is faithful with little shall be trusted with much.” However, it is one thing to speak, or tweet, it and a totally different story to live it! Let me give you two examples to make this easier to digest.

  1. Having served as the first Minister of Health in post-Apartheid South Africa, Dr Dlamini Zuma has to have had a weighty voice in the Thabo Mbeki ARVs saga. Since women are the most affected by the virus and subsequent disease, it would have definitely been in their best interest that the Honourable Dr speak up to save the lives of the infected and protect that of the affected. While she was no longer in the Health office, she was still close enough to advice and counsel it. This, she failed to do. Whether or not she tried is what we will never know! Perhaps she was afraid of losing her position because of defying the President’s orders… This too, we will never know!
  2. As the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Dr Dlamini Zuma had access to the legislature that governs foreign trade among other ‘foreign affairs’. This meaning that she would know about most, if not all, major alliances between South Africa and, at least, other African countries. The contacts she made during those two terms must have been very helpful during her term in the AUC. Yet, it was barely two years after she was elected as chairperson that 276 Nigerian girls were abducted. This would have been a great opportunity for our Honourable Doctor to assist in emancipating women, yet she failed once more. And if she did try, then this too we will never know. To top it all off, these girls we abducted by an armed terrorist group known as Boko Haram – whose firearms are allegedly supplied by a South African business. This is only but one of many national disasters that, much like the Zuma household, she could not handle.

Dr Dlamini Zuma is an inspiration to women; she has achieved so much within her lifetime. However, I am not convinced that leading well is one of those achievements. And although it would be good or BBBEE purposes, it would be rather irresponsible to consider her gender and race as enough reason to elect her. While South Africa desperately needs to transform, deploying people into positions that they are not suitable for is the reason why we are in a recession. Women can lead; we are ready for a female president. We have always been. But the Honourable Doctor Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma is not the female president we need. The question that we are now left with is who that first female president is… perhaps what South Africa needs is a young person who looks out for the best interest of the country and has not been corrupted by a long political history!

Photo credit: www.nkosazana.com

The commodification of youth unemployment

By Action Setaka

In many platforms where I am invited to speak on socio-economic issues, I always argue that we live in a money-orientated world. “Our poverty, miseries, traumas and even simple acts of kindness are converted into business for making money. If plans to make money are not found out of any of our problems. Those problems hardly receive solutions until the plan is made on how to make money out of them,” therefore today I argue that commodification of unemployment is real and it is the foundation of catastrophic conditions we live in.

The fact of meeting in fancy places to discuss matters affecting people living in destitution has its own connotations. But as a person with absent character and energy to complain, my excitement lies with the fact that we are all willing to do something about it and accommodate all voices on this issue of unemployment. Unemployment is one thing which must be prioritised by all organisations and government departments as it is the root cause of challenges we are facing. To be precise, unemployment is the reason why we have crime, corruption, xenophobia, afrobobia, and many other issues. It is a threat to the universal right to life therefore a caring government and private sector must join hands in defeating this scourge.

I have different angles to qualify my assertion of believing that unemployment is being commodified. I will start with basic circumstances which commodify unemployment. The fact that you need copies of numerous CVs and Z83 forms to send to prospective employers is money which benefits those running internet cafes and it remains a wonder why government still uses such an old and expensive method to recruit. To attend interviews you must always look “professional” to impress prospective employers, including in your everyday life, as you won’t know when you will meet your saviour. These interviews and life are expensive to maintain. Postage and transport to go to different locations to market yourself are very expensive. Data to browse for jobs and opportunities is costly and mobile networks are arrogantly making money out of this. Anything which has to deal with searching for employment requires money yet you find confident and unscientific claims from some in our country blaming our people for laziness.

As if it’s not enough, the Department of Health Minister, the progressive and hands on Aron Motsoaledi is on a mission to introduce sugar tax, he is so passionate, I envision him vowing for fat tax in near future which will make certain foods unaffordable, this is done in an innocent and noble plan to control the diet of our people so that we don’t become an obese and an unhealthy nation. What Dr Motswaledi fails to recognise is that our people will eat anything edible for human consumption which is affordable. If our people were working, his wonderful vision of healthy living was going to be easily attainable. Employ young people, pay them well so that they are able to have a healthy dietetic choice of food. So instead of rushing to introduce sugar tax, perhaps radical employment creation must be what he lobbies for positions of influence the minister serves in.

Agencies:

Agencies charge clients rates that includes provisions for statutory deductions in their salaries. They are gateways to super exploitation of our people. Their interest is just to make money. The only thing a person gets from their links is debt. These agencies are often used by the private sector to avoid fair labour practices. They are in the same category with EPWP piece jobs. The fact that it acts as though it puts bread on the table cannot justify the insult it is,  it’s just an illusion that it puts bread on the table what it does quite correctly do is to put young people in indebtedness and excessive exploitation, same with these agencies.

Corporates:

The SETAs funding to businesses to host learnerships and internships is not used well because corporates use this funding as a money making scheme but they fail to fully fulfill expectations. They use it as a “quickie” process so that they finish and get other funding to host others. They are not interested in empowering young people that is why the learnerships and internships still don’t have a clear exit strategy from the business side. My view is that the prerequisite of SETA funding should be permanent employment for learners after training so that if they fail to adequately transfer skills, they nicely suffer from their own creation in production. Government can’t be providing so much money for training of young people and they go back to streets.

Bribes naturalisation

Money to bribe or potential to grow brands regardless of capacities. Bribing is now a naturalised hiring fee because people saw a business opportunity in unemployment. If you don’t have anyone working in the family who can pay officials for you to get employed, prospects are that your chances of not working in your life will be permanent. The least you could do is to be related to those with powers to employ.

How commodification of employment causes problems:

  1. You will have a country where everyone is a politician, leading a country to be directionless. Anyone who is jobless or in need of a government opportunity joins politics so that they can be in close proximity with state resources for narrow selfish interests. People with capacity to implement the country’s progressive policies gets snubbed in favour of politicians. If you are able to make a loud illogical argument using political colloquialism, you see yourself as the best politician and possible government officials

 

  1. A talentless nation where populism is everything. When you are popular everything comes your way, talented emerging stars are ignored and few measures are in place to nurture their talents. Those who are popular/celebrities also do almost everything. They are politicians, business, actors, signing and doing things which they would care less if they risked tainting their integrity.

 

  1. Business without passion and relying too much on funding. The idea that young people in business are failing is a myth to a certain extend. It’s a myth because certain aspects of the reasons beneath are not explored. We have failing businesses because the idea that business for many is not a passion or calculated vision but it is because of wanting to escape the poverty zone. That’s why some young people who aspire to be in business claim to not be able to operate due to funding because to them funding is the Alpha and Omega of operations. After being funded their businesses collapse because they would use all the funding for conspicuous consumption. Passionate ones operate even under difficult circumstances with no start-up finances. Promising business for young people must be well funded so that they hire their peers and minimise unemployment. If they are assisted, I am convinced that all these opportunists-turned-entrepreneurs will close down and get employment from those genuine ones who will be helped.

 

  1. Graduates are unemployed but jobs go in favour of incapable and uneducated politicians. This sour reality makes young people devalue education. To them getting a job is more important because whether educated or not they all end up forming part of same statistics (of unemployment) at one point. Graduates and intellectuals are often spited for being clever for nothing in their communities. There is no practical respect for education under these conditions of commodified unemployment.

 

  1. Because of hunger and commodified life, ex-offenders are even comfortable with breaking the law so that they can enjoy life in jail where basic needs are taken care of accordingly. It makes it hard for them to adjust to the money-orientated life with just few or no opportunities to assist their rehabilitation process. Nyaope-smoking and consuming liquor daily is used to portray “I don’t care about life” attitude to avoid living in destitute soberly.

 

  1. Our people sell and rent everything including RDPs which were meant to provide a dignified life but because of this commodified employment renting out their RDPs becomes a viable option to sustain survival. Job scams makes  a lot of money robbing our people and playing “dice” with their hopes even when we raise awareness, they don’t listen because the status quo reached a point where our people are unable to establish truths from facts. They don’t just take money, our people don’t have but leads to rapes, human trafficking and drug smuggling. Young girls justify prostitution as a result of this state of affairs while bosses and top government officials demand sex in exchange of employment. This results in women wrongfully accused when they prosper, tale bearers will often suggest they slept their way on top. Those of us who are gender activists find this worrying and that’s why we are hitting the ground running in attempts to change the status quo.

We have good policies, we just need willing leadership, pragmatic luminaries and selfless servants in right positions. We need government leaders who are not economical with the truth but who mean what they say and say what they mean and mean exactly that. Our minds and hearts (Ubuntu) are enclosed by love for money and we need to free ourselves from this. We need to play our part in getting rid of unemployment.

Action Setaka is a Social engineer, advocate of intellectual discourse, 2016 Member of National youth parliament (commissioner of youth and access to education) and an Activator at Activate Change Drivers

 

 

 

 

 

Literacy should be a lesson first administered at home

By Zilungile Zimela

Contrary to popular belief- the black nation IS a reading nation. From the elementary ages of reading Chappies Bubble gum wrappers, we have been reading. The scourge of illiteracy among the marginalised groups is wide spread emanating from a myriad of reasons one of which is the availability or the lack thereof- of parents who read to their children.

ACTIVATE! Change Drivers as a network of 2000-plus young people is currently leading conversations that question the norm with the intention of challenging and changing the narrative that “The rich get richer, while the poor get poorer.” The measure of poverty is not in the currency of money alone, it is also in the form of skills deficiency, the lack of access to basic services such as libraries and reading clubs which thereby contribute to illiteracy. “We do not read a lot, because these books are not in our mother tongues and the whole mental conference that goes on in your mind as you translate English to your home language makes reading a drag,” said Activator Action Setaka at the Literacy Hackathon.

The ACTIVATE! Hackathons have been specifically designed to provoke conversations, yield results whilst changing the status quo. Young people across the country are seen sitting in different round tables, restaurants, school halls and informal settings to engage with one another in order to come up with solutions to the problems in our society which- due to their prevalence- have been either reduced to be the norm or have grown grey hair.

The literacy hackathon set the tone for robust discussions that will later be turned to meaningful strides. Young people from different corners of South Africa are gathering up in arms to make local government work, to being critical parts of policy making engagements and driving engines of the desired solution. Sizwe Maphindani is a publisher and author of the provocative read entitled “Message to a Blackman in Africa” which has sold over 13000 copies in the greater of America. He is a 2015 Activator who shows his commitment to change by working hard every day to perfect his craft of writing and being actively involved in the process of editing, for a credible and correct end product. The challenges connected to accessing reading material go beyond their prevalence in the perceived marginalised spaces, it is tied together with the willingness and availability of parents to sit down with their  children and read stories to them in their mother tongue first before assuming a strong articulation in a language that is not their own. A young person with a strong sense of self who understands who they are in the context of their language can be seen to be far more enlightened than an academia with numerous scholar accolades. The Hackathons are specifically designed to ask critical questions on the burning issues with the intention of conjuring up solutions that are actionable in the context of young people.

“I read a lot when I was younger because my mother administered reading to me and that practice spilled over to my adult life,” articulated Activator Khanyisa Mpepho on literacy and her involvement thereof. As the ACTIVATE! Change Drivers network attempts to progressively address this challenge, Activators across the board will be engaging in discussions and campaigns that promote reading as a culture and norm. These discussion will exist in virtual spaces to lobby a wider audience into the discussion. Using social media for social change has been the ongoing activity used by Activators on all corners of the country to ensure reach to a wider audience. The ACTIVATE! Literature Hackathons attempt to address the following questions among other things:

  • As “African” writers, do we think and write from where we are? Or is our thinking and writing informed by Western discourse? – Activator Rammolotsi Sothoane.
  • How are African intellectuals and academics failing in laying the blueprint to future generations on matters connected to literacy access thereto ? – Activator Action Setaka.
  • How can we write from where we are when we have been reading books all our lives at school that tell us about “snowfall during Christmas” when its very hot where we are during Christmas?-Activator Prince Charles.
  • How can the 21st Century African child go back to listening to stories passed on from generation to generation about the African culture from the elderly generation? Social Activist Lezerine Mashaba
  • How do we ensure that there is access to African literature on the commercial book shelves and that there is enough resources to access those books thereby contributing to the alleviation of illiteracy.

Reading is an exercise that has proven to broaden the sphere and the frame of reference of the mind, it opens up a person to a world of imagination and critical reasoning which contributes to how a person’s life is shaped. With that reason borne in mind, the ACTIVATE! Literacy Hackathons will continue to strive for excellence in literacy with every dialogue and opportunity to impact change.

Activator Blessing Mutiti’s super power is resilience

Name: Blessing Mutiti

Province: USA

Facebook: @ Africanmythbuster

Twitter handle:@blessmutiti

Instagram: Africanmythbuster

What is the essence of being a woman to you?

Knowing my worth before anyone else defines it for me and setting goals endlessly

What is your super power?

Resilience, knowing my worth and exercising a strong sense of self-esteem.

What words would you use to describe yourself?

Goal oriented, Leader, resilient, ambitious and passionate

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

No, womanhood should be recognised every day and one month put aside is kind of limiting in itself. I wish for a world where being a woman is not perceived as a need for special tolerance but equally significant as the other genders.

They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

Women have supported men who have consolidated their positions in leadership because naturally women are incubators, they are resilient, they nurture and they motivate. Without women, there will be chaos and men will not be the leaders they are.

How do you think society perceives women?

In a very subjective way, very demeaning mostly. Unfortunately even so for the president of the most powerful country in the world, USA.

How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

Setting goals consistently and faithfully following through. Not allowing anybody to dictate my pace, my worth and believing every day that I can do more; the sky is not the limit.

What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

There has never been a better time for women to be involved at every level they want to be; whether in academics, politics or economics. They are gifted because they can do this from bottom up starting with the family level.

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

I am an environmentalist, activist and a sound academic. I will be counted among men with PHD’s in the science field. And I am working on passing on the legacy by supporting young girls to consolidate their interest in science and environmentalism.

Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Do not be hasty, take time and develop your skills. You are set apart because you are unique and do not conform, dare to be different.

Activator Keneuoe Masegela is passionate about empowering women

Name: Keneuoe Masegela

Province: Gauteng

Facebook: Keneuoe Rorisang

Twitter handle: @KellykeneuoeM

Instagram: @Keneuoe_Rorisang

What is the essence of being a woman to you?

The essence of my womanhood lies in my passion for the future of my people

What is your super power?

Love

What words would you use to describe yourself?

Resilient

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

Women’s month is significant to me because womanhood is the source of all life and our contribution to the future is vital.

They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

Definitely, when a woman succeeds the whole nation benefits. Words of Wangari Mathai

How do you think society perceives women?

Society perceives women as fragile people who need constant saving.

How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

Woman empowerment is very close to my heart, when we make decisions we connect to our situations and our emotions are our strongest characteristic

What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

To stay resilient, courageous and enduring.

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

I am not afraid to speak my truth and stand by it.

In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

Peaceful and more progressive.

Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

I would say it is okay to be different it’s okay to be rebellious if your rebellion brings about positive change. Fear is a state of the mind, free yourself. Love is a possibility

 

 

Remembering Marikana

A poem by Activator Hein Scheepers

My parents are miners whether in a shaft or in a retail store working as a Petrol Attendee
We are Working class. We are Miners. We Are Marikana
Who would have thought that we will also be part of a generation that witnessed how the government massacres humans workers citizens. 
ANC is running the world’s latest brutal neo-colony for the sake of global economy looting the resources of the Mother land to protect the privileges of oppressors in maintenance of “economic apartheid;
Non Rich Only Non Poor Only
Social instability

16th August 2012 I remember that evening watching News and I couldn’t believe, I would have never conceived that I will live through the Repression of Class struggle by The State for a just cause, again in a Fake New south afrika a country where democracy serves as a smokescreen for Colonial Imperial powers to continue looting plundering natural resources, We are cheap labour human commodities as wage slaves under paid and All we were Doing is Protesting for a decent minimum wage, only to be classified as illegal demonstration striking, again against a salary that keeps us poor while we can’t feed clothe educate our children to discontinue generation slavery

The Sea To The Hills, From The Valleys and Up The Mountain to the killing at the small Koppie
Wasn’t the silencing the slaying of poor angry marginalised exploited humans natives Afrikans suppose to stop?
To give your life to save the world is something greater 34 Miners died for Us.
The Farlam commission of inquiry is
like The Goldstone Commission report on Bisho massacre
The evidence given to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to make
The Nation forget without Justice being Served I am Man in The Green Blanket, murdered by police in Marikana my name is Mgcineni “Mambush” Noki a 34-year-old married father from Mqanduli Eastern Cape “He didn’t speak for himself. He spoke for the workers.”

Grief overflows Our Reality
How much do you need to know before you do something?
human forms Consumed with selfish thoughts.
Today is a day of mourning…
Have a heart be a soul show your humanity,,,,
and my eyes are filled with tears
This life and existence under which we are made to suffer, how much more?? when will this end??
I am ready to leave this realm. I want to destroy all of this. I want this to end now.
I Am not in love with this illusion
I Hate Capitalism

REMEMBER MARIKANA
LEST WE FORGET
ALUTA CONTINUA

Love as a Super Power for Vanessa Mojapelo 

Name: Vanessa Mojapelo 
Province: Gauteng
Facebook: Vanessa Nophe Mojapelo
Instagram: @nessafilms

1. What is the essence of being a woman to you? 
Being true, respectful and understanding to myself and every woman.

2. What is your super power? 
Love.

3. What words would you use to describe yourself?
Brave, loving, impulsive, caring sometimes annoying.

4. Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?
I don’t because its women’s month all year long.

5. They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to? 
I relate to it, because a man has a vision, and a woman have a plan.

6. How do you think society perceives women? 
Women are perceived as men’s gifts.

7. How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?
I am committed to change how women perceive themselves because that’s where it starts. I am part of a Womxn group that is dedicated to getting women to understand each other, grow together and love each other.

8. What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?
The role of women   is giving the development function instead of more money orientated developments.

9. In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?
By not letting my capabilities be limited by the fact that I get periods every month.

10. In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?
I think more organised – but the truth is that presidents are just faces of a well-planned agenda that worked out years ago.

11. Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Learn to forgive yourself and love yourself no matter what…