The role of education in transformation

The journey was a powerful and an amazing experience and I am still humbled by the various lessons I gained. Emotions were rolling up and down especially when I did not know what will be happening the following day even though it was exciting to be in the “survivor” show. I found myself asking what happens when unity is practiced, what happens when powerful minds come together to share powerful ideas? What was achieved by A! Bus journey was historically significant, a titanic battle of ideas was the order of the journey.

Visiting the East London Museum made me realised that transformation is key for the country to move forward. We can learn about transformation but we haven’t practically applied it in our communities. It is our responsibility as citizens to take charge of our transformation. While we look at the bright future we should acknowledge our heritage and identity. It is important that communities get involved, as Steve Biko said, black communities are tired of standing on the touchlines to witness the game that they should be playing. They want to do things for themselves and by themselves.

During the journey, I have gained insight about the EC province, in fact there is a lot that South Africa can achieve through transformation of our heritage and leadership. It is imperative that we realise the important role of education in transformation through the introduction to multiple frames of reference that are all seen as equally valid. Education should open spaces for critical engagement with the differences and possibilities across a range of worldviews. We acknowledge that there are different ways of being that are equal, even though they are different, and creates spaces for critical engagement with a difference. We need to accommodate diverse methods of enquiry, drawing from different worldviews and philosophical underpinnings. Bringing varying intellects, scholars of theory and practice, liberal thoughts, pan-africanist thoughts, masters of thesis, synthesis and anti-thesis, individuals who possess clarity of thoughts and profundity of thoughts made this journey a nucleus of what the future holds for ACTIVATE as an organisation.  I am inspired by the possibilities of responding to our community issues and realities within the local/national context.  

No words can express the gratitude felt and the sheer pleasure of the participants in engaging in this very necessary topic for vision 2030. This engagement shall be the catalyst for more vigorous and frank discussions the network will have and we shall once again humbly expect your contributions.

I am looking forward to the beloved community which will be formed not by the eradication of difference but by its affirmation, by each of us claiming the identities and cultural legacies that shape who we are and how we live in the world – bell hooks.

I look forward to continued engagements and keeping a cohesive network.


A deep desperation for change

On the 26th of October 2016 a group of young leaders embarked on a journey in the Eastern Cape which took up three central themes: (i) Tracing back history, (ii) Steve Biko’s Legacy and (iii) Fort Hare University (UFH) and its role in the liberation movement.

As young leaders we were slapped with the reality of our current circumstances, basing this on the history of South Africa as seen through the eyes of East London and its rich legacy. We first took a step back into history; each day was filled with what I call, “an awakening to realise the need to go back to the future!” Each day roused in us the conviction that South Africa still has a long way to go before we all can enjoy what it has to offer.

As I reflect on the week that was, I cannot help but feel a deep desperation for change. I feel as though I have been plunged into a deep sense of nostalgic pain of a time I did not experience, and yet felt the pain so acute, so profound, it forced me to consider my position in society and the role I play in advocating change.

The journey was an eye opener. Journeying into past roads in the shoes of those who have already walked in them, an experience which was both emotional and a reality check, simultaneously.

The Steve Biko and UFH tour opened my eyes to the fallible education system that seeks to undermine the black brand further. It perpetuates slavery through systematic miseducation of the black mind (as defined by Robert Sobukwe – ‘an African whose allegiance is to the natural black child). Discussions amongst the youth erupted around the issue of education many times during the tour. The sentiment that was robustly debated was the fall of the current education system which does nothing for the development of the black child. It does nothing to help the black child understand himself/herself and his/her potential, consequently, the black child remains under the white child, as a result, the black child will never reach a state where she is primus inter pares (first amongst equals) with non-white South Africans, notwithstanding the global village.

I, ergo, am resolved to be a leader in the edge of chaos, who will lead a disruptive divergence from the status quo, to lead through education that develops the black child to be black, and in her blackness, to not look discriminatorily at other races as though they are inferior to hers, rather, to achieve a state of being a first amongst equals. To appreciate every race and what it has to offer in the greater scheme of things, all the while not compromising herself or subordinating herself to other races.

The A! Bus journey reminded me of what Carter G Woodson said in his book The Miseducation of the Negro when he observed: “If you can control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his action. When you determine what a man shall think you do not have to concern yourself about what he will do. If you make a man feel that he is inferior, you do not have to compel him to accept an inferior status, for he will seek it himself. If you make a man think that he is justly an outcast, you do not have to order him to the back door. He will go without being told; and if there is no back door, his very nature will demand one.” 

This, in a nutshell is what I found myself reflecting on throughout the journey. All skin colours that fall under the black child reference has a mammoth task, tantamount to moving mountains, and that task is to undo what has been done over four centuries of miseducation, and to educate herself anew for future generations to truly enjoy the sacrifices and wisdom of African giants like; Thomas Sankara, Robert Sobukwe, Steve Biko, inkosi Albert Luthuli, Goven Mbeki, Patrice Lumumba, Samora Machel, Julius Nyerere, Jomo Kenyata, Carter G Woodson, Marcus Garvey, W E B DuBois, Sellina Johnson-Sirleaf, Haile Selasie, Kwame Nkruma, Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngosi Adichie, Bessie Head and the likes.

This trace into the past has been an incredible journey, and indeed did not end when the bus drove off, leaving us young leaders transformed, emotional and resolved to fight for a better South Africa and Africa in her greatness; rather, the journey continues long after this retreat by the bus, we will fight on, having our first mission being very clear: Influencing the redo of the Steve Biko statue standing in the corner of a block of East London municipal offices.

 

Thank you Activate Leadership for an experience with so much value, no amount of words can express.

On the 26th of October 2016 a group of young leaders embarked on a journey in the Eastern Cape which took up three central themes: (i) Tracing back history, (ii) Steve Biko’s Legacy and (iii) Fort Hare University (UFH) and its role in the liberation movement.

As young leaders we were slapped with the reality of our current circumstances, basing this on the history of South Africa as seen through the eyes of East London and its rich legacy. We first took a step back into history; each day was filled with what I call, “an awakening to realise the need to go back to the future!” Each day roused in us the conviction that South Africa still has a long way to go before we all can enjoy what it has to offer.

As I reflect on the week that was, I cannot help but feel a deep desperation for change. I feel as though I have been plunged into a deep sense of nostalgic pain of a time I did not experience, and yet felt the pain so acute, so profound, it forced me to consider my position in society and the role I play in advocating change.

The journey was an eye opener. Journeying into past roads in the shoes of those who have already walked in them, an experience which was both emotional and a reality check, simultaneously.

The Steve Biko and UFH tour opened my eyes to the fallible education system that seeks to undermine the black brand further. It perpetuates slavery through systematic miseducation of the black mind (as defined by Robert Sobukwe – ‘an African whose allegiance is to the natural black child). Discussions amongst the youth erupted around the issue of education many times during the tour. The sentiment that was robustly debated was the fall of the current education system which does nothing for the development of the black child. It does nothing to help the black child understand himself/herself and his/her potential, consequently, the black child remains under the white child, as a result, the black child will never reach a state where she is primus inter pares (first amongst equals) with non-white South Africans, notwithstanding the global village.

I, ergo, am resolved to be a leader in the edge of chaos, who will lead a disruptive divergence from the status quo, to lead through education that develops the black child to be black, and in her blackness, to not look discriminatorily at other races as though they are inferior to hers, rather, to achieve a state of being a first amongst equals. To appreciate every race and what it has to offer in the greater scheme of things, all the while not compromising herself or subordinating herself to other races.

The A! Bus journey reminded me of what Carter G Woodson said in his book The Miseducation of the Negro when he observed: “If you can control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his action. When you determine what a man shall think you do not have to concern yourself about what he will do. If you make a man feel that he is inferior, you do not have to compel him to accept an inferior status, for he will seek it himself. If you make a man think that he is justly an outcast, you do not have to order him to the back door. He will go without being told; and if there is no back door, his very nature will demand one.” 

This, in a nutshell is what I found myself reflecting on throughout the journey. All skin colours that fall under the black child reference has a mammoth task, tantamount to moving mountains, and that task is to undo what has been done over four centuries of miseducation, and to educate herself anew for future generations to truly enjoy the sacrifices and wisdom of African giants like; Thomas Sankara, Robert Sobukwe, Steve Biko, inkosi Albert Luthuli, Goven Mbeki, Patrice Lumumba, Samora Machel, Julius Nyerere, Jomo Kenyata, Carter G Woodson, Marcus Garvey, W E B DuBois, Sellina Johnson-Sirleaf, Haile Selasie, Kwame Nkruma, Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngosi Adichie, Bessie Head and the likes.

This trace into the past has been an incredible journey, and indeed did not end when the bus drove off, leaving us young leaders transformed, emotional and resolved to fight for a better South Africa and Africa in her greatness; rather, the journey continues long after this retreat by the bus, we will fight on, having our first mission being very clear: Influencing the redo of the Steve Biko statue standing in the corner of a block of East London municipal offices.

Thank you Activate Leadership for an experience with so much value, no amount of words can express.


THE ACTIVATOR 2016

In this bumper edition, catch up on Activator stories; events; Imbizo’s; the You Count Survey; what happened when ACTIVATE was represented at the UNESCO Conference and a new Innovation Challenge for 2016. Filled with photo’s and successes of the Network, this edition promises to be a good read!  

Content Highlights:

Page 8: Imbizo’s: Find out about all the Imbizo’s held for 2016 and gauge the media reach across the country.

Page 4: Walala Wasala: Meet Activators who participated in the Walala Wasala television series.

Page 5: Taking to the polls: As we look back on the local government elections, we find out what communities have to say and how the You-th is Making Local Government Work.

Page11: Connecting Communities: The inaugural rural dialogue series was a resounding success. We highlight the success of three rural dialogues held in Kwa-Zulu Natal, Eastern Cape and Mpumalanga. 

Page 14: Switchers Making a difference: We look back on the SWITCH year that was and the inugural SWITCH Weekend Seminar.

Page 15: Training in Action: We take you through Module 3 highlights.

Page 17: ACTIVATE Educating: We introduce the Community Development Certificate Course (CDCC) to the network.

Page 20: The A! App: Find out ways to keep in touch with the network.

Page 22: The Innovation Challenge: We challenge Activators to come up with innovative ways of dealing with social ills.

Page 30: Where are your ACTIVATE stations?: We show you where all the ACTIVATE stations are across the country.

To explore is to experience

Mmeza Gaborone from Upington who participated in the Gauteng leg of the ACTIVATE! Journey, reflects on what the journey meant to her.  

My experience on the A! bus journey with fellow Activators from different provinces was immensely exciting. The journey came with cleansing, clarity and closure of Activating2030. I marveled at the sublime peace which the journey brought to my soul. The combination of nature and learning created a sincere and calming duet. The initiative was a testament to the possibilities of realising a better South Africa by 2030, as contemplated in the National Development Plan (NDP). I was also able to observe personal behaviors from my fellow Activators and our guests during the Gauteng leg of the A! Journey. Although my way forward comes with limitations, my experience during the journey will benefit my path.  

The first day started with profiling of Activators and ascertaining what country we imagine in 2030. Shooting a television series in front of big cameras was a great experience. On the second day, the adventure began to The Cradle of Humankind, Sterkfontein Caves where we spent our day with Dr Nonhlanhla Vilakazi. We spent the day engaging and interacting with each other about Roots and Identity. Where do we come from? What does it mean to be human and why does it matter?  Many of us were confused and could not immediately differentiate between the two. The A! Journey was remarkable and unforgettable as memories were made.

On the third day we made our way to the infamous John Vorster Square, a place that was used as a detention centre mostly for political activists. Those sent to “detention” were not allowed to have any contact with family members. We were privileged to meet and engage with former detainees, Dr Prema Naidoo and Dr Elizabeth Floyd who shared with us their views on the current state of our nation. The mood was somber as many of us we were touched by the stories we heard. We also visited John Vorster SAPS to meet South African artist Mr Pat Mautloa who explained the inspiration behind his sculpture, “Simakade” the big beautiful rock.

As I reflect on the last day of the journey, I became more excited and was in high spirits imagining the future of South Africa by 2030. Our journey continued to Soweto where we were joined by Seth Mazibuko, a student leader at the forefront of the June 16, 1976 student uprising. During his speech, he touched our hearts with the horrific story about how he was tortured at the age of 16 years. Visiting the Hector Pieterson Memorial and Museum held significant importance in the political history of South Africa. For many of us, it was the first time we visited the historic site which was an honor. I extend my gratitude and well wishes to my beloved Activators who joined me on the A! Bus in Gauteng. God bless our hustle. I’m honored and humbled to be part of the A! Bus Journey. #Activating2030

 To follow the incredible ACTIVATE! Journey visit: www.activateleadership.co.za/journey

Tackling one social ill at a time

Name:  Xabisa Euberta Roqo

Province: Eastern Cape

Xabisa Roqo describes herself as outspoken, persuasive, respectful and purpose driven. She is observant and helpful with a bubbly personality.

What are you championing in your community?

I am championing inactivity and I have a team of senior citizens who are also involved in the Golden Games conducted by the department of Social Development and the Department of Sports, Arts & Culture.

How are you driving change in your community?

I’m driving change in my community by conducting dialogues where I have young people coming together and tackling one social ill at a time with the help of our councillor. This month we decided to grow a garden in an open space to tackle poverty.

How has ACTIVATE! and the network supported you in driving change?

Using all the information I’ve obtained from ACTIVATE! and used it to my advantage. At first when I conducted dialogues I didn’t go about them the right way but now I do.

The Bus Journey

Why have you decided to be part of the Bus Journey?

I have decided to participate in the Bus Journey because I have so many questions which I believe might be answered on this journey. I feel the need to promote the network as it has done so much for me in a very short space of time. I want to show people that we exist and that they can also be part of this great network educating us and helping us drive change

What are you hoping to take out of the Bus Journey?

I am hoping to network and get answers. I want to hear peoples stories; I want to understand the why’s; the why nots and the how’s so that I can extend my knowledge and be equipped to walk my talk.

What are you most looking forward to on the Bus Journey?

I am looking forward to engage with the legends, I want answers personally from them and not what we read in the newspapers. I want one-on-one conversations. I want to interact with them.

I want the A!Bus to attract ordinary people; I want them to ask questions, I want to answer them and I want to inspire them to drive change .

In an ideal world, who would you like to engage in conversation with on The Journey? Why?

I would like to engage in a conversation with Mrs Winnie Nomzamo Madikizela Mandela. I would speak to her because she is the first black professional social welfare worker who chose to provide service to needy. Her devotion to the struggle for equality and justice even though she suffered harrasment, imprisonment and periodic banishments, she never gave up. For me, she is one of the most contentious figures in modern South African history.

What are your plans for next year?                                                    

Next year I want to register my NGO the Sakhuluntu (building people) which will involve the loxion economy and deal with social ills by using sport.

How will you be involving the network in your plans?

I want my NGO to generate funds which will also help some Activators when they need funds.

 

Stop the scourge of gender-based violence

Name: Luzuko Melapi

Province: Western Cape

Luzuko describes himself as a hardworking, enthusiastic individual who loves going out. He is a positive person and grabs any opportunity with both hands. He volunteered for ten years in the HIV/AIDS sector and helped change the conditions around the primary health care system and NHI white paper policy engagements.

What are you championing in your community?

I work on campaigns around gender-based violence, absent fathers, SRH and HIV counselling.

How are you driving change in your community?

I am part of an organisation called Mosaic where I work as a community mobiliser and facilitate workshops. I work with the community around domestic violence and offer free counselling around relationships and families.

How has ACTIVATE! and the network supported you in driving change?

ACTIVATE! has developed me holistically as a person. My mind and spirit was uplifted and the organisation helped me drive change in the community. The skills that ACTIVATE! gave me made me a young change driver for a better south Africa.

The Bus Journey

Why have you decided to be part of the Bus Journey?

I feel that ACTIVATE! has invested in me as a young person who is driving change in my community as well as  to get exposure for the organisation I work for and to talk about the importance of ending gender based violence.

What are you hoping to take out of the Bus Journey?

I would like to come back knowing that I have connected with young people and was able to make a difference in disadvantage areas. I also would love to come back and the work of the network is being spread throughout the provinces.

What are you most looking forward to on the Bus Journey?

Exposure for my organisation in other provinces, the creation of partnerships and the fun on the trip as well.

In an ideal world, who would you like to engage in conversation with on The Journey? Why?

I would like to engage with the youth and people who are interested in changing the scourge of gender-based violence in South Africa. I would also like to engage with funders who are interested in piloting the work we do in other provinces, especially in rural areas.

What are your plans for next year?                                                    

I plan to teach youth about SRH at the early stages involving life skills as a development approach towards gender equality. I also yearn to have a society in which gender-based violence does not exist and reaching the AIDS conference goals.

How will you be involving the network in your plans?

I will involve the network by recruiting young people between the ages of 15-24 years to be part of advocating gender equality in the trainings and workshops that involve a project called Stepping-Stones that I facilitate for young people.

 

 

The New African Struggle: Through the Lens of Biko

Most people consider the Republic of South Africa to be a ‘democracy’. Millions of rural and sub-urban South Africa, it is something relative. A composition of ambitious chancers parading as semi-gods.

To truly understand the dilemma, we need to return to the time prior the ‘democratic-dispensation’ when the apartheid government had accepted that the UN would never allow ‘the Union’ to return to the separate states that the British Empire conquered to form the Union of South Africa, and begun a single Republic based on Constitutional Democracy.

Mindful of our past, one thing remains certain and that is, South Africa is still a hurting nation. South Africans have reconciled without contrition, thus the ghosts of the past are haunting the nation. In essence, we have not made peace with our past and therefore, our past continues to tear our present apart.

On the one hand, we may debate on the ‘better government’ forever; we can argue and wrangle like we’re known for; we can even attempt to compare our past with the present. The truth is, based on our collective material conditions, South Africa has improved.

On the other hand, we’ll never reach a common consensus on whether the apartheid government of the National Party offered a much better SA than the ‘openely-corrupt’ government of the ANC. For precision, a large majority amongst ourselves will take sides just like many would rebuke the comparison on justifying a devil for another.

On the contrary, however, the reality is that most people are unhappy. There’s a constant silent voice reminder that’s embedded in the conscious of Africans that says ‘this is not what our forebears (Eskia Mphahlele, Steve Biko, Robert Sobukwe and many more) have died for. The silent voice continuously whispers into our conscience whenever Africans need to make impactful decisions.

As a result, voting expressions have changed in the country, especially in the big metros. People moved from their ‘self-proclaimed’ liberation movement to the ‘ancient-diluted slave-master’.

Future Challenges: Building Worthy African Institutions

Eskia Mphahlele once said: “I am an irrepressible teacher, and I’ll teach anywhere I am invited to. So long as I will not be subjected to play the role of a token n*gger.” Following this, Steve Biko wrote: “the greatest weapon in the hands of the oppressor, is the mouth of the oppressed.”

Now, doing forecasts from our beloved South Africa, we need to ask ourselves the difficult questions.

Since we’ve learnt about the establishment of the British Crown and its’ world controlling power through economies, turning people into economic slaves, the illegality of the Union of SA in 1910 and possibly every successive government in the country since, including the present, all token niggers of the British Crown, what are we doing to secure a better future for our successors?

Mindful of how the Crown wishes to control the whole wold by the installation of their New World Order and how they are using Communism as their levelling tool of societies and Agenda 21 to install regulations. How the global system is the watchdog of the Crown and that the Crown is the financial arm of the Vatican!?

South Africa, we need to engage in serious conversations!

Given the material conditioning in our public spaces, how do we ensure that we do not become victims to the tyranny of the text in the context of Eskia Mphahlele? How do we solve the tribalist, linguistic superiority complexes of majority languages in a society that is deeply defined by difference? How do Xhosa-speaking people find expression in a dominant Sotho speaking region? Is South Africa (Azania) ready for economic revolution? What and how is the process for achieving economic liberation? Why and how can the oppressor tell the oppressed the correct way to protest oppression? How do we re-engineer society to be colour-blind in a world where blackness is continuously degraded and whiteness is standardised as the current currency towards human civilisation? How do we find balance when blacks are still absorbed by white supremacy?

Through Biko’s lens, is there logic with South Africa being led by an Indian youth in institutions of governance?

Through Biko’s lens, are we content with our governing institutions being erected, owned, managed and led by the oppressors?

Through Mphahlele’s lens, why is South Africa continuously denying its’ children to be mentally emancipated? How long will Africans continue playing roles of token niggers? When will enough be enough?

A distant friend of mine, Ms. Jesse Mangena once said: “So long as you are worried about what others think of you, you are owned by them. Only when you require no approval from outside yourself, can you own yourself. Be your own liberator.” Ultimately, amidst popular beliefs that cross-cultural identities are the new norms, the truth is, today more than any other time in history, diversity is the reality that informs human life.

Leadership And Identity

There can be no leadership without identity, self-realisation and a built-in desire to lead. Usually, leaders understand that before one even calls themselves a leader. They live through demonstrating the values and morals which define their identity and their up-bringing.

To the dismay of many “millennials,” a leader is not defined by your followers on Twitter or by your Facebook likes, nor is it defined by the distinctions you receive in an exam. Leadership is the ability to soberly distinguish between green and yellow, yes or no, right and wrong, and in doing so, make critical decisions that will either make you popular or deface you. Leaders are constituted by the inner voice and mind, able to think and reason about why certain issues or problems arise in our societies, why people behave the way they do and how best to resolve situations without resorting to violence and anarchy.

In South Africa at this point in time, being a youth means that you are uninformed, not represented, voiceless, disruptive, violent, untrustworthy and not deserving. We are currently facing an ignorant, self-centred and egotistic leadership that is not prepared to come down from their metaphorical high horses and attend to basic issues which the youth seek to address. We are facing high levels of crime as a result of unemployed, frustrated youth. In 2016, the youth want access to higher education but there is no solid plan to accommodate such, but yet government says it is sleeping with the same blanket as the youth. Ask yourself, who is fooling who?

The legacy left by the likes of Steve Biko and Ahmed Timor has had a big impact on the youth. The youth is adamant that the only thing that can prevent them from fighting for their rights is live ammunition. In that regard, the likes of Masixole Mlandu, Athabile Nonxuba, Mcebo Dlamini and Aviwe Gwayi define a strong youth identity. These leaders have shown strength against all the odds as they, with the rest of the student population are ready to hold the bull by its horns and sleep with the hyena.

Bra Steve Bantu Biko, proudly born in the domain of the Eastern Cape in Ginsberg Township, a few kilometres outside King Williams Town, is a pure example of what leadership is about. Biko who was a student leader and later founded the Black Consciousness Movement which empowered and mobilised much of the urban black population through fair practices, transparency and accountability was silenced because of his transparent actions and ideas for a better South Africa. It is unfortunate that this self-motivated, dedicated leader could not witness the genesis of a new South Africa. Fortunately, his identity has remained behind to continuously manifest what he believed in. Today, the Steve Biko Memorial Centre in Ginsberg is a rich historical site that keeps on educating and informing generation after generation about Steve Biko, the great icon.

The youth of today is indeed stepping in the footsteps of great leaders of the past like Biko and Ahmed Timor. Ahmed Timor was a true reflection of a fearless leader, but because of brutal acts conducted by police during the apartheid years, his ideas were shattered. Many were left to believe that this icon had committed suicide at the John Voster Square, but we know how police of that era used to torch politicians who were verbose. For many, the John Voster Square became a suicidal site, where anyone who entered was not guaranteed coming out alive. 

If Biko was still alive, I’m certain he would have provided leadership to the cries of the students, and condemned the burning and demolishing of academic structure and property just like any sober-minded human being. With that being said, Biko would have urged students to remain united, unshaken in their struggle and to keep it as genuine as possible. 

Given the circumstances the youth is exposed to on a daily basis, it is paramount that the youth care about their future and also state affairs. We cannot shy away from the fact that government is only prepared to dish-out wage subsidies for graduated unemployed youth, creating a culture of dependence along the way.

You should ask yourself, what legacy are you going to leave behind? When you are six feet under, what are your neighbours and those close to you going to remember you for? Anyone can learn from these great leaders and have an impact in society.

Let us be the change that we want to see. 

Networking In Action

Name: German Jacobs

Province: Northern Cape

German Jacobs from the Northern Cape describes himself as a person who loves seeing other people grow.

What are you championing in your community?

Youth development through Education and Social Entrepreneurship

How are you driving change in your community?

I am involved in a project call operation 100% Paballelo High where I basically tutor Grade 12 leaners in Accounting. I am also running my own company called Gla Business Consultants. I have managed to register 50 companies so far and a couple of NPCs. I am also involved in a group call K6 where we run different programs in our community. K6 members are all Activators from Upington

How has ACTIVATE! and the network supported you in driving change?

It has helped me connect with a lot of other Activators from Upington as I didn’t know most of them prior to becoming part of the network. I also managed to collaborate with an Activator from Mpumalanga and today I am proud to say we own a company together. I also help other Activators to register their NPCs and companies after being introduced to the network and help share my field of interest.

The Bus Journey

Why have you decided to be part of the Bus Journey?

I believe me being part of the journey will help share my story and represent the Northern Cape with the hopes to get more people involved in my project and get more people from the Northern Cape to become Aactivactivators.

What are you hoping to take out of the Bus Journey?

An amazing story profiling Activators and a new learning experience. I want to find out how Activators cope and deal with the pressure of juggling between their prospective projects and personal life. Most importantly I’m hoping to take experience our of the journey which I share with my fellow Activators.

What are you most looking forward to on the Bus Journey?

Amazing conversations with Activators

In an ideal world, who would you like to engage in conversation with on The Journey? Why?

Someone like Dj Sbu because he is honestly someone young people could learn from. One of the key factors in society that leads to negative challenges faced by young people are unemployment and with his social entrepreneur and leadership skills we can learn a lot.

What are your plans for next year?

My Plan is to operate my two companies on a full time bases and open my own office in the CBD. I will also be involved with the K6 NGO. The NGO is in the registration phase and will be run by six Activators from Upington.                                                                                                 

How will you be involving the network in your plans?

I am hoping to sponsor at least five Activators with fees to attend the Community Development course offered by the network next year. I have already shared the idea at module 3 so next year I want to execute it. 

 

                                                                                                                                          

We Need An Intervention

Name: Anele Wondo

Province: Western Cape

Anele Wondo from the Western Cape describes herself as a passionate individual and a believer in human development.

What are you championing in your community?

I’m currently coordinating an interim committee for development (social) at my former school. In the past four years the standard of the school went down dismally and so did the pass rate due to gangsterism. My portfolio is to help out with intervention programs, which is a work in progress. I also help upcoming musicians to master their craft- artist management. 

How are you driving change in your community?

At the moment I’m in the process of building and strengthening relationships with local stake holders, part of that is putting arts and culture on the map so it can be recognised as an intervention. 

How has ACTIVATE! and the network supported you in driving change?

Activate has introduced me to a very large network of amazing and very dedicated young people in SA. The program has helped to identify my strengths as an individual and how to structure my work.

The Bus Journey

Why have you decided to be part of the Bus Journey?

The Bus journey sounds like an innovating and once in a life time opportunity. The reason I decided to be part of it is because of the content of the journey, being part of individuals who will put the network’s profile out there is an honour for me because I believe in the A! Network.

What are you hoping to take out of the Bus Journey?

The conversations and the networks I will be making. What I’m hoping to take with me is how we can boost the network and how can we get other young people out there to be part of the network, as we are targeting 5000 come 2020.

What are you most looking forward to on the Bus Journey?

I have never been to Soweto, which holds a very rich history about our country. Also looking forward to meeting Activators I haven’t met, and of course what other people (‘’celebrities’) think of young people in this country, as far as development/innovation is concerned. 

In an ideal world, who would you like to engage in conversation with on The Journey? Why?

I would like to engage with Masechaba Lekalake (tv presenter on The Big Debate and producer and radio show host.

From the show ‘’One Day Leader’’ on SABC 1, I realised how passionate Masechaba is about sustainable development of the African child. Her involvement in provocative social issues made me fall in love with her inner being. She inspires and motivates me to do more as a black women. She would be an ideal person to converse with.

What are your plans for next year?

I’m registering an NGO (‘Sokhana Foundation), which will later will be a foundation in my son’s name. The NGO focuses on a couple of projects, and one happens to be the ‘Donate A School Bag’ campaign that will focus on fundraising for education for kids from poor back grounds.

I’m currently in the process of profiling my own company, which will be 100% women owned. The company focuses on events/artist/brand/and project management and PR\Marketing.

How will you be involving the network in your plans?

I’m going to use my services, PR and Marketing to put the network out there.

Like I proposed to Chris, we will also make Activate a stakeholder in the ‘Donate-A-School Bag’’ campaign\project as this will boost the network. The project is a huge one and a lot of companies and celebrities want to get involved so they can champion the campaign. 

PRESS RELEASE: Youth Explore EC & GP In Search Of Ideal Future

24 October 2016

 

YOUNG LEADERS EXPLORE EC & GAUTENG IN SEARCH OF A PATH TO AN IDEAL FUTURE

ACTIVATE! Change Drivers, a network of young South Africans, is testament to the possibilities of realising a better South Africa by 2030, as contemplated in the National Development Plan. From 26 to 28 October 2016, the Network embarks on a bus journey at key historic sites in Eastern Cape and Gauteng. During this journey, 36 members of the Network, known as “Activators” who hail from all parts of the country will attempt to reconnect with the past so they can understand the present, in order to elevate their work towards a vision for a country of their longing.

“This journey isn’t just about being at these sites, but it’s also about sharing hope and inspiration that a vibrant network of young leaders exists and so many great things are coming out of it already,” says Chris Meintjes, CEO of ACTIVATE! Change Drivers.

The journey will form part of a new three-part reality television reality, #Activating2030: A! Journey, produced by Urban Brew Studios. It will cover topics such as roots and identity; black consciousness and leadership. Here’s what the journeuy will look like:

 

Day 1:

  • GP:  The journey will start at the Cradle of Humankind with Dr Nonhlanhla Vilakazi, a doctor of paleoanthropology and a sangoma, who will re-connect the Activators to their origins in a unique spiritual and historical way.  This day will end with a fireside chat at Constitution Hill.
  • EC: Activators will visit the East London Museum, where they will discuss the evolution and extinction before walking in the footsteps of ancient humans at the Nahoon Point Nature Reserve. At the end of the day, they will relax around a fire with a member of the Sandile Royal Clan exploring how traditional leaders can support and work with young leaders running transformation projects in their villages.

 

Day 2: 

  • GP: Activators will visit John Vorster Square and the Apartheid Museum. Artist, Pat Mautloa will talk about his artwork “Simakade”, which is a testament to the courage and resilience of people that were previously detained there.
  • EC: Activators will visit the Steve Biko Centre and Biko memorial sites and engage with the legacy of Steve Biko and Ahmed Timol. 27 October is the anniversary of Timol’s death in detention at John Vorster.

 

Day 3:

  • GP: The Hector Pieterson Memorial in Soweto will be visited. Seth Mazibuko will share his experience during the ’76 student uprisings. They will then progress to Freedom Square in Kliptown.
  • EC: Activators will visit the University of Fort Hare and will tour historical sites on the campus such as Beda Hall, Robert Sobukwe Walkway and Freedom Square.  This activity will highlight the role of the university in the development of illustrious leaders and political consciousness. Current students will talk about issues that face them now and provoke a conversation on alternative ways of developing youth outside of universities.

“This platform will allow me to interact and engage in a dialogue of a different nature and on different issues that we hardly talk about. The journey also provides a platform where Activators can showcase how they are trying to change communities,” says Lisa Silwana, an Activator who will be participating in the Eastern Cape journey.

A social media campaign, including a live blog (www.activateleadership.co.za/journey) of the journey as it unfolds, will track these activities over the duration of the tour, taking the debate to a national level and co-creating a vision for 2030.

ends. 

NOTES TO EDITORS:

 

  • ACTIVATE! Change Drivers is a network of 2000 young change makers across South Africa who are finding innovative ways to transform their communities and the country as a whole. The Network connects these young people and equips them with necessary knowledge and skills to thrive in their respective efforts.
  • Journalists are welcome to interview these young leaders on location
  • Follow conversation on Twitter via @ActivateZA on #Activating2030

 

Issued by ACTIVATE! Change Drivers. For more information please visit www.activateleadership.co.za

For media related queries, please contact:

Nelisa Ngqulana

Communications Manager: ACTIVATE! Change Drivers

Email: nelisa@localhost (cc: communications@localhost)

Cell: 073 817 8017

Only 2 days to go! #Activating2030

Learning Is An Ongoing Experience

Name: Sikhonza Madasa

Province: Eastern Cape

Sikhonza Madasa from Engcobo in the Eastern Cape is a final year student at the University of Fort Hare. He describes himself as a visionary. He is a calm and disciplined person but at the same time very vocal and talkative.

What are you championing in your community?

The struggles of young people in my community and the broader South Africa

How are you driving change in your community?

I run small Imbizos for young people who are active in their communities. I conduct these Imbizos in order to educate and inform the youth about the channels we can use when challenging local government. I furthermore run an NGO called Cefane Youth Development Organisation (CYDO). I am also the Secretary of the African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL) at my branch.

How has ACTIVATE! and the network supported you in driving change?

ACTIVATE! has given me all the tools and skills I possess today which includes vital information about mechanisms we as the youth can use to bring about change.

The Bus Journey

Why have you decided to be part of the Bus Journey?

I am sure the Bus Journey will be informative and I will learn many from other people as well as them learning from me.

What are you hoping to take out of the Bus Journey?

I am hoping that as South Africans we start recognising our unsung heroes through the Bus Journey.

What are you most looking forward to on the Bus Journey?

Learning, learning and learning!

In an ideal world, who would you like to engage in conversation with on The Bus Journey and why?

I would love to engage with Dr Blade Ndzimande so that I can discuss the possibilities around free higher education and how we can go about implementing it.

What are your plans for next year?

My plans for next year is to find a job as I will be finishing school. I also hope to intensify the Imbizos I’ve been hosting and perhaps turn them into classes.

How will you be involving the network in your plans?

I will be working hand in hand with the network and Activators of the network

 

A Dual Journey of Discovery

Two busses; one in Gauteng and the other in the Eastern Cape; each occupied by 18 young leaders who strive to make a tangible change in the poverty stricken communities they hail from. These young individuals understand that change does not occur overnight, but they also understand that change can begin with a mere conversation.

ACTIVATE! Change Drivers, a youth-led organisation of 2000 members recognises the instrumental role young people play in society. To this end, they will be embarking on a three-day journey visiting historical sites that will see young leaders from as far as EXesi in the Eastern Cape and Kabokweni in Mpumalanga come together to initiate an enduring conversation that will send vibrations through the veins of the country.

The three-day journey will form part of a three part television reality series produced by Urban Brew Studios called #Activating2030: A! Journey. The reality series will tell a character-driven story of the convictions, motivations and opinions of the young leaders on the bus. In the series, the courage and convictions of these young leaders are brought to life through the various developmental projects they champion in their communities.

“I feel that this platform will allow me to interact and engage in a dialogue of a different nature and on different issues that we hardly talk about. The journey also provides a platform where Activators can showcase how they are trying to change communities,” said Lisa Silwana who will be on the Eastern Cape bus.

Two groups of youth aka Activators from across the country will converge in two busses embarking on two different journeys that will take place simultaneously in Gauteng and the Eastern Cape. One of the motivating factors driving the ACTIVATE! journey is to foreground the concerns of the youth, their intentions and their dreams in a manner that is as authentic as the ACTIVATE! Network.

The entire journey is constructed around themes like leadership and identity which are made more profound by visiting historical sites like the Hector Peterson Memorial in Soweto or the University of Fort Hare in Alice. By visiting historical sites of significance, the journey confronts great leaders and events of a bygone era that evoke conversations around leadership; the role of the youth; the significance of the past and the hope for the future.

Throughout the journey, Activators will engage in conversation with prominent individuals like Paleoanthropologist and Sangoma, Dr Nonhlanhla Vilakazi; Imtiaaz Cajee, biographer and manager for the Ahmed Timol Trust and 1976 student leader, Seth Mazibuko, among others. The aim of these discussions is to drive dialogue around what is possible for our young democracy.

Day one of the journey will see Activators in Gauteng visit the Cradle of Humankind where they will attempt to connect with the origins of humanity while trying to connect with the soul of who they are. Day two will see Activators in the Eastern Cape visit the Steve Biko Memorial Centre exploring Biko’s ideas and what that looks like today. The final day will see Activators explore a youth in action theme and how the youth can use their power for the betterment of society.

“I have never been to Soweto, which holds a very rich history of our country. I am filled with expectancy when I think of visiting the Hector Peterson memorial for the first time,” said Anele Wondo from the Western Cape who will be on the Gauteng bus.

The ACTIVATE! Bus Journey is only five days away and promises to be a journey of discovery; unearthing a narrative that will map out a country envisioned for 2030. By showcasing inspired youth who are driven to see a country in which all citizens thrive, ACTIVATE! opens a discussion firmly entombed in creating solutions that can be a catalyst for problem solving and innovation.

For more information visit: www.activateleadership.co.za/journey

Social Entrepreneurship Through Innovation

Name: Sphelele Brian Mchunu 

Province: KwaZulu-Natal  

Sphelele Brian Mchunu from Miriam Hill in KwaZulu-Natal describes himself as a leadership coach, innovator and social change champion. He is an entrepreneur who places the interest of his community first. 

What are you championing in your community?  

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation and Technology

How are you driving change in your community?

I currently work with social entrepreneurs under the theme Professionalisation of Youth Work. The focus of the training is to highlight the importance of branding, marketing, digital presence strategy and storytelling of social enterprises.

I’m the founder of a summit called I-Innovate4Afrika which is a platform that is aimed at creating platforms for social enterprises to encourage dialogue with innovators and digital champions on “How to incorporate Innovation and Technology within their ventures?”

How has ACTIVATE! and the network supported you in driving change? 

The network has supported me in mobilising resources in order to host training and workshop. I also collaborated with Activator Nkosikhona Mpungose and Nonkululeko Hlongwane who supported me when I hosted a 4-day (two weekends) residential work on Professionalisation of Youth Work in partnership with the Democracy Development Program.

Furthermore, the network has also supported me to mobilise other Activators and youth leaders to participate in workshops and other training I have hosted. 

The Bus Journey

Why have you decided to be part of the Bus Journey?

I’m interested to participating in conversation that will create the foundation to explore and collaborate. I believe being in the bus will create a platform for me to explore opportunities that we as South African Social Entrepreneurs can tap in to while ensuring that we continue to drive change in our communities.

I also want to learn about activities other Activators (on the Bus and those who will be hosting us) are doing in their communities and start exploring how we can support each other to expand as an organisation and social enterprises.

What are you hoping to take out of the Bus Journey?

I’m hoping to take and sustain partnerships that will be created during the Bus Journey. I furthermore hope I take away solutions that we as a network can introduce to support and increase participation within the network.

What are you most looking forward to on the Bus Journey?

I look forward to engaging in dialogue about social entrepreneurship; our current South African politics and innovation and technology.

In an ideal world, who would you like to engage in conversation with on The Bus Journey and why?

Vusi Thembekwayo, because I believe he is one of South Africa’s social entrepreneurs who are changing the face of business and the development of our communities. I’d really be interested to hear and have a conversation about his strategy and methodology as an agent of change and businessman.

What are your plans for next year?                                                    

In the next year I plan to grow and expand the I-Innovate4Afrika. I’m looking to expand by hosting the summit in Gauteng, Eastern Cape and the Western Cape. I will also be introducing an I-Innovate4Afrika Challenge which is aimed at involving South African youth to create Apps4Change.

How will you be involving the network in your plans?

I hope to collaborate with Activators to support each other to self-mobilise for the summit. I also hope to introduce the role of innovation and technology into our spaces and how it can support our social ventures.

The responsibility of being a student at The University of Fort Hare

I feel sorry for the people who never got a chance to study at the historic institution of Fort Hare. This university unlocked literal and figurative doors for the black child, thereby improving many lives.

The University of Fort Hare is the first Southern African institution to have produced five presidents for different countries in Africa. Fort Hare has produced a number of great leaders who sought to access higher education at the institution like Nelson Mandela, Robert Sobukwe, ZK Mathews, and the first black Chartered Accountant, Prof Wiseman Nkuhlu.  

As a public institution founded by the Eastern Cape community with people like Chief Tyali playing a major role in its establishment, Fort Hare has always been at the forefront of the struggle for liberation in South Africa.

As a third-year student, it is a privilege on its own to study at the University of Fort Hare. Many people will never get an opportunity to study at this historic institution, as many students do not have the opportunity to study. As universities in Southern Africa go, the University of Fort Hare is an institution that many Africans wish to enrol in because of its historical significance.

I must at the same time express my disappointment at the name of the university. After 22 years of democracy, we continue to be subjected to the memory of how John Hare killed and slaughtered our parents during apartheid. The name of the University of Fort Hare as well as the curriculum needs to be decolonised.  As the university produced five African presidents, and even more African leaders in society, a need exists for an African agenda to be put forward in the identity of the institution.

It is my contention that the institution needs to be African in nature and have a curriculum that also represents us as African people. The name needs to reflect this Africaness and perhaps the institution needs to adopt a name of one of the great leaders who walked through its doors. To this end, a submission was presented to the management of the institution to change the name to the University of Sobukwe since he was the first SRC President of the institution and liberated many Africans around the continent through the university.

It is a huge responsibility to be a student of the University of Fort Hare because of its rich history. Sobukwe once said that Fort Hare must be a barometer of the African thought, and now that we are at the verge of free education, we as the students of this significant institution have a major role to play in the country as drivers of the movement. A third year student at the University of Fort Hare, Sikhonza is passionate about using Imbizos as a mechanism to initiate and evolve dialogue in communities. 

Photo credit: University of Fort Hare 

Arming Young People With Knowledge

Name: PRINCE CHARLES

Province: EASTERN CAPE

Prince Charles from Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape describes himself as a critical thinker who believes in the future of South Africa. He is a firm believer that a non-racial society founded on a shared national identity is possible.

What are you championing in your community?

In my community, I champion causes related to gender, crime, youth development and the promotion of debate.

How are you driving change in your community?

I champion several causes in my community. Having being part of the Youth Development Agency and as part of their Start Here campaign, I train and assist youth who are still at school with career and subject choices. The team has also been working with youth who are out of school and are looking for employment. We assist them with training on how to compile CVs while assisting those fortunate enough to be called for interviews with skills on how to cope with interview questions.

I also work closely with the religious community; predominantly Christian churches effectively encouraging a greater involvement from them on prevalent social issues.  I furthermore have a close relationship with several NGO’s where I facilitate gender talks for learners and discuss concepts of gender. This looks at how young people can break the cycle of gender stereotypes which has, in many instances, resulted in gender based violence. 

How has ACTIVATE! and the network supported you in driving change?

The network has effectively connected me with like-minded individuals who see different approaches to prominent issues. The network has encouraged me to share my views and ideas on various issues. ACTIVATE! has published several opinions pieces which have encouraged me to explore writing as a means of further disseminating ideas. 

The Bus Journey

Why have you decided to be part of the Bus Journey?

I decided to be part of the journey because I see it as an opportunity to explore what other young people are doing and how they have managed to deal with several challenges. Therefore, I am of the view that this journey is an opportunity to learn.

What are you hoping to take out of the Bus Journey?

Firstly, I hope to take out motivation from the Bus Journey. I also hope to learn and obviously network. I am of the view that the sharing of experiences is important and vital in any form of development an individual wishes to endeavour.

What are you most looking forward to on the Bus Journey?

I am looking forward to the discussions; I am looking forward to meeting and engaging with young people from different sectors.

In an ideal world, who would you like to engage in conversation with on The Journey? Why?

I would like to engage in conversation with activists like Jay Naidoo or analysts like Angelo Fick primarily because most of their analysis is quite progressive and balanced on prevalent issues.

What are your plans for next year?

Next year, I plan to finalise my studies and also work closely with various stakeholders I have met in Namibia where I am currently based to draft plans and programs used to handle a serious issues affecting the youth in Namibia. An example is the issue of “passion killings” which is quite prevalent in Northern Namibia.

How will you be involving the network in your plans?

I believe the network has a major role to play. I will be using the training methods which I learned from ACTIVATE! and possibly attempt to get representatives of the network to come to Namibia and outline to the various Namibian structures of government what the network does in South Africa and the benefits of having youth led interventions.

 

 

Bridging The Gap Between Education And Socio-Economic Development

Name: Mboneleli Gqirana

Province: Western Province

Mboneleli Gqirana from Delft in the Western Cape describes himself as a social entrepreneur interested in the development of youth through educational activities linked to socio-economic development opportunities.

What are you championing in your community?

I am championing the development of reading clubs in libraries and schools. These serve as a vehicle for the greater development agenda of the youth. We then extend the reading clubs to tutoring sessions, extra-curricular activities and also link it to personal development opportunities.

How are you driving change in your community?

I am driving change in my community by bringing together diverse groups of people for the common good. In a multi-racial area like Delft, this is not easy. However, if we are to attain the goals of a just and developing society, we need to ensure greater collaboration from stakeholders who would not normally work with each other.

How has ACTIVATE! and the network supported you in driving change?

I joined the ACTIVATE! network in 2015. To this day, I still collaborate on projects and keep in contact with Activators who share the same interests as me. I do however feel the network can gain a lot by ensuring Activators from different provinces work together more. We need to investigate the current structures (reps, etc.) to ensure they’re effective and serve the interests of the greater network.

The Bus Journey

Why have you decided to be part of the Bus Journey?

I have decided to be part of the bus journey to hear from diverse voices about the situation in which we find ourselves as a country. Most importantly, I’m very interested in hearing about ideas on solutions to get ourselves out of this challenging period. Partnerships are also very important, so I’m eager to expand the network in which I operate in.

What are you hoping to take out of the Bus Journey?

To expand on collaborative opportunities; get a hold of where the country is; be inspired by other people’s work and also contribute to the discourse on how best the country can move forward by workers from different areas of expertise.

What are you most looking forward to on the Bus Journey?

I am most looking forward to solution-oriented discussions on the various issues that we face as communities and as a country. I hope there will be a lot of information sharing. It’s also crucial that the momentum from the Bus Journey is carried forward to an action-oriented program of action by the participants, whether individually or as a collective.

In an ideal world, who would you like to engage in conversation with on The Bus Journey and why?

I’d like to engage with Lindiwe Sisulu. She is interesting to me because she has served in Parliament and yet seems to have a lot of experience about how communities can develop. She has a lot of information about mechanisms we can use to fight for our rights and access opportunities.

What are your plans for next year?                                                    

Next year, I will continue my studies into looking at how commercial models can benefit non-profit causes in situations unlike the traditional corporate social investment environment currently employed by many corporations.

I’m really interested in how organisations can achieve self-sustainability. For this, I continue to use the book clubs we’ve built as a vehicle.

How will you be involving the network in your plans?

I stay in touch with the office about my work, through Lezerine Mashaba. I’m also close to finalising partnerships with the Learners Movement of South Africa (LEMOSA) which is headed by Asavela Peko, an Activator.

I also regularly attend and support events by Activators like an event hosted by Thembinkosi Matika, which centre around personal development and understanding the business trajectory of South Africa.

Next year, I also hope to extend my work to other provinces with Activators like German Jacobs (North West) who has already agreed to work with me on various projects.

 

In Pursuit Of A Progressive Mindset

Name: Yolokazi Mfuto

Province: Eastern Cape

Yolokazi Mfuto from Exesi in the Eastern Cape is a woman who knows where she comes from and where she is going. She is a self-confessed communication freak and loves being informed. Her motto in life is: “Treat people the way you want to be treated, only then will we live in peace.”

What are you championing in your community?

I am passionate about development. I’m striving to develop my community so much that they are empowered in each and every corner where they reside. My vision of development is not something you can touch but rather an abstract representation of progression. I believe in empowering the mindset of people so that they can own up to anything they do. I furthermore champion the destruction of negative stereotypes that surround women.

How are you driving change in your community?

I’m part of three organisations at my University (what?) where I do community development projects through them. These projects range from peace, to motivating learners in high schools and taking extra care of those with special needs.

How has ACTIVATE! and the network supported you in driving change?

Activate! has done a lot for me since Module 1 in April. Before Activate! I can honestly say I was a bit ignorant of some issues my community faced, but now I have gained so much zeal and cognisance of my actions and the things I do for my community.

The Bus Journey

Why have you decided to be part of the Bus Journey?

When I first received information about the Bus Journey my interest was peaked at the onset. I was like “this is great, it needs to be done, people need to know that this country is not as bad as they think and we are not doomed as the youth of this country.” I felt like its time people know there are young stars in rural areas who have great dreams for South Africa; Africa and the entire world. I know a lot of people will benefit from this and definitely will be inspired!

What are you hoping to take out of the Bus Journey?

Knowledge!  I want to learn as much as possible. Meeting new people is always a win for me. I always allow myself to have an open my mind to learn and observe new ways of doing things that could be better than the current way I’m doing things. I believe from the journey I will get inspiration from other young Africans who are set to make the world a better place for us all.

What are you most looking forward to on the Bus Journey?

I am looking forward to everything! I’m looking forward to sharing my story and definitely learning as well, just because knowledge inspires me.

In an ideal world, who would you like to engage in conversation with on The Bus Journey and why?

It would definitely be Basetsana Khumalo who was Miss South Africa a long time ago and who is now in the entertainment and media industry. She has accomplished so much from owning a production company and her own TV shows while grooming women to stand their own ground. She is proof that being a women is not just standing behind a man’s shadow.

What are your plans for next year?

I will be finishing my degree and doing some other community projects.

How will you be involving the network in your plans?

Already I have contacts of fellow activators, and whenever I need anything I call, and already we are planning something with activators from my NPO.


The Innovative Community Developer

Name: Nkosikhona Welcome Mpungose aka Uzzi

Province: KZN Durban

Nkosikhona Mpungose from KwaMashu in KwaZulu-Natal is a community developer by nature and an innovator.

What are you championing in your community?

I’m championing the termination of social ills in my community through organisational projects.

How are you driving change in your community?

I drive a drug prevention programme as well as HIV response programmes.

How has ACTIVATE! and the network supported you in driving change?

ACTIVATE! has supported me in many ways; from designing my project logos as well as supporting my community dialogues with refreshments and stationery through the Station programme of ACTIVATE!

The Bus Journey

Why have you decided to be part of the Bus Journey?

I decided to be part of the Bus Journey in order to explore, inspire, educate and share my experience as well.

What are you hoping to take out of the Bus Journey?

I am hoping to be inspired by fellow Activators which will hopefully motivate me to do more in my community!

What are you most looking forward to on the Bus Journey?

I am most looking forward to making relevant connections that can help me grow personally and in the work I do.

In an ideal world, who would you like to engage in conversation with on The Bus Journey and why?

Buti Manamela from the Presidency or Youth Manager from the Office of the Premier or the Mayor. I would really like to know what their programmes are and how my community can benefit from them. This will furthermore enable partnerships since we both share the vision of improving society.  

What are your plans for next year?

One of my plans for next year is to co-ordinate a High School Students Parliament Project that will create spaces for students to be trained on leadership and personal development as well as be involved in the policy making process.

How will you be involving the network in your plans?

The network will be involved through the ACTIVATE! Station programme and collaboration with other local Activators.