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Love as a Super Power for Vanessa Mojapelo 

Name: Vanessa Mojapelo 
Province: Gauteng
Facebook: Vanessa Nophe Mojapelo
Instagram: @nessafilms

1. What is the essence of being a woman to you? 
Being true, respectful and understanding to myself and every woman.

2. What is your super power? 
Love.

3. What words would you use to describe yourself?
Brave, loving, impulsive, caring sometimes annoying.

4. Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?
I don’t because its women’s month all year long.

5. They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to? 
I relate to it, because a man has a vision, and a woman have a plan.

6. How do you think society perceives women? 
Women are perceived as men’s gifts.

7. How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?
I am committed to change how women perceive themselves because that’s where it starts. I am part of a Womxn group that is dedicated to getting women to understand each other, grow together and love each other.

8. What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?
The role of women   is giving the development function instead of more money orientated developments.

9. In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?
By not letting my capabilities be limited by the fact that I get periods every month.

10. In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?
I think more organised – but the truth is that presidents are just faces of a well-planned agenda that worked out years ago.

11. Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Learn to forgive yourself and love yourself no matter what…

Chantal Martin’s super power is giving love

Name: Chantal Martin

Province: Northern – Cape

Facebook: Chantal Chante Martin

Instagram: Chantalchane

 What is the essence of being a woman to you?

The real essence of being a woman is the ability to nurture and to love deeply, unconditionally.

What is your super power?

My super power is giving love to others who needs it.

What words would you use to describe yourself?

Young independent mother, who loves her family and is passionate about being the change I want to see in my society.

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

Yes, I do relate . The significance of being a woman is there to raise a village , love the unlovable ones and being the woman she is destined to be.

They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

Indeed I agree. Remember without the touch, the love, the support of a woman no man will survive being on earth even if it is only for one day.

How do you think society perceives women?

They don’t think we can take up leadership positions, they think we are too weak and soft. But actually women are more keen to see change happen.

How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

To become the change I want to see in my society especially for  the young girls in my community. That in order to be an independent young woman you have to work for what you want .

What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

Women are slowly starting to be independent and become more successful in any field they put their minds on.

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

To never be dependent on a man , to make me feel as if I only exist when I need his help. To get rid of that mentality that women and men are equals.

In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

Honestly there would be less chaos. A woman knows what a family needs and with that she will be able to provide for those who needs it the most.

Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Always be true to yourself no matter what obstacle life throws at you as a woman and never change to be accepted by society.

 

 

ACTIVATE! Men celebrate women

By Gladys Nomvuyo Sebeko

In 1956 20 000 women took to the streets to fight an oppressive government. They did not focus on colour or status. The unity they shared made the oppressor listen and make changes. 64 years later we see women in high positions and some even in Parliament. The government is even trying to help women get into business and sustain their businesses.

With all these improvements, some might ask why do women still have to prove themselves before they can be recognised. Some women even work twice as hard to make sure that men treat them as equals. The question in mind will be what the march of 1956 did for women and what can we learn from it? ACTIVATE! men in the network share their opinions on why the day is significant to them.

Nhlanhla Ndlovu 2016 Gauteng Activator

Activator Nhlanhla Ndlovu

1956 was very significant; it did indeed serve its purpose and more.  Women rights were something that started in the early 1900s.  So halfway through the century, for women of different creeds, cultures and religions to come together as one was a powerful step.

This changed the thinking that women were meant for the kitchen and that they didn’t have real influence within the political landscape.  This march was peaceful and marvelously orderly. It showed up at a time of great violence, yet they did conduct themselves as such and violence didn’t erupt.  The impact was heartfelt by the ruling party at the time.

The significance herein is also due to the fact that this is was also about a decade after Robert Sobukwe’s national stance against pass laws from when the Sharpeville massacre happened.  A successful non-violent march is a significant one in our history, and it was a 20 000 women.

What needs to change today is that young women need to learn from that generation of women.  Today, women have access to just about anything and information; couple this with the tact and wisdom of the 1956 generation, their impact could be more.

Nkosana Mtshingane 2017 North West Activator

Activator Nkosana Mtshingane

I know a few people that have suffered in the hands of the apartheid regime and have not been compensated or had their names mentioned or them being recognized.  Some women even supported their husbands in exile while earning close to nothing but no one talk about that.

Women need to be acknowledged in all fields of professions and political movements.  The mentality that women are housed objects and ornaments have to end. Men need to know that women are as important as men and they also played a part in the struggle too.

Ratlou Mabula 2017 Limpopo Activator

Activator Ratlou Mabula

The march was more focused on protesting against the introduction of “dom passes” for particularly black women, even today when 09 August approaches one thing that dominates the mind seems to be the fight against carrying “dom passes.”  Women fighting “dom passes” and their demands dwelling mostly on the pass instead of right to equality and an outcry to the end of oppression.

What we learnt from the day was that 14 000 petitions were carried for presentations by representatives from each race group in South Africa.

What we currently see is women trying to isolate themselves racially to discuss transformation among themselves during their empowerment programmes.

Thus shows great lack of unity among them, resulting in a particular group feeling more entitled for empowerment and it halts progress to their slogan “Wathint’ Abafazi wathint ’ imbokodo” as there imbokodo won’t be solid”

After 64 years we see another side of the struggle for woman, the fight against violence. We have seen reports of women being killed by their partners and the law just giving the man a slap on the wrist. We also see people in high positions wining abuse cases against women and the law choosing to look the other way.

The question in mind should be what are we as Activators doing to make sure that the world treats women better? How are we helping fight the war of women abuse? Activators “it is in our hands” we cannot call ourselves leaders if we don’t lead by example.

Activator Kgadi Mmanakana’s super power is serving people

Name: Kgadi Mmanakana

Province: Limpopo

Facebook: Kgadi Mmanakana

Twitter handle: @KgadiMmanakana

Instagram: @the_possibilitarian 

  • What is the essence of being a woman to you?

To play a role of a mother which is a divine mission given only to women due to their innate resources; nurturing and intuitive nature.

  • What is your super power?

I am excellent at serving people (servant leadership is in me).

  • What words would you use to describe yourself?

Possibility thinker, intuitive, compassionate, passionate and resilient.

  • Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

Yes, Women’s Month to me is a reminder of the pivotal role they played in shaping our country and a sneak peek of the good that can happen when women are granted a chance to lean in and sit at the “big” tables. As a young woman living in a very patriarchal society, this month is important to me; not only to be reminded that I too (as a woman) can actually lead but to be empowered because we cannot ignore the fact that gender stereotypes still exits and are denying this country or rather world of the change its waiting for.

  • They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

No, my statement will be “behind every strong WO/man there’s themselves” because the greatest power /strength comes from within.

How do you think society perceives women?

Incapable of leading and “not strong enough”. As an active young person in the community and a business person who is a female, I’ve found myself having the feeling and need to prove myself thrice as hard that I can actually deliver on that business project, in a meeting rehearsing my opinions before uttering them to a room with 50+% of men (this was before I read Sheryl Sandberg’s book Lean In, now I am no longer intimidated). I’ve also found having fruitless discussions with my male counterparts on the issue of having a female president in our country. My male counterparts argument was that the country is not ready for that, reason being “You are a woman and emotional.” Another vague reason or rather reaction I ever got as an ambassador of Women in Engineering was that “girls can’t do math and science because they’re girls” and a sigh that says “but you are woman” when you say you are an engineer or studying.

  • How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

I am a sage and inspirational speaker and personal coach on leading a purpose-driven happier life full of possibilities; I have launched a tour (New Beginnings Inspirational Tour) couple of months ago to equip, inspire and affords individuals an opportunity to rewrite their stories, claim their dreams back and learn how to respond to life struggles in a constructive way.(The theme of the tour is : Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% is how you respond to it). As part of the tour I’ve incorporated focus groups (New Beginnings Circle 4Her (for females) and 4Him (for males) ,the circles are the hands-on version of the tour. As an active and responsible citizen I play my part by participating in public gatherings concerning development of my community/country, by serving as a sounding board to young people looking to start projects in their communities.Over and above by being a definition of possibility that inspires others to start seeing possibilities in their own lives.

  • What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

Being nurturers and intuitive leaders.Women are very instrumental and have been endowed with powerful traits that any country that want to grow needs. Naturally women are nurturers and intuitive; they put others’ needs first and they great at making right decisions! People say women are too emotional and can’t lead ; I say let’s look at Mme Thuli Madonsela- she’s an ethical leader that stand her ground regardless of the heat. To me she’s a great example of what a woman can do given a chance.

  • In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

I initiate and support projects that equips, empower and inspires young people (men and women alike) to get to know themselves and meet their own inner power; that creates possibilities for them (access to info, resources, skills development and education) and give them a space to lead. My work as a business strategy consultant, speaker, volunteer affords me an opportunity to achieve that.

  • In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

Adequate service delivery with a strengthened “Batho Pele” principle.

  • Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Kgadi, you matter.As much as the world need Person A, the world also needs YOU!

 

 

Activator Philadelphia Sanzinza’s super power is nurturing

Name: Philadelphia Sanzinza

Province: Northern Cape

Facebook: Siziwena Samunzala Sanzinza

Twitter handle: @Siziwena

Instagram: @Siziwena

  • What is the essence of being a woman to you?

To me the essence of being woman is motherhood and being able to share and give so much love endlessly and being peacemakers and homemakers without wanting to be rewarded for it.

  • What is your super power?

I am a nurturer that is my superpower

  • What words would you use to describe yourself?

Protector, lover, fighter, teacher, nurturer, child, learner, motivator,

  • Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

Yes I do, it plays a big role in the history and lives of women. The day teaches and motivates us to let our voices be heard and not to be afraid to live our dreams.

  • They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

Yes it is true, and Yes I can relate to it.

  • How do you think society perceives women?

Society sees women as child bearers who should be submissive and know her place is in the kitchen. That women are weak and do not have a voice and that they cannot lead.

  • How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

I am committed to change the mindsets of women and to let them know that they can be whatever they want to be and that our daughters should be taught they can be independent and have a mind of their own and do not need someone else to do the thinking for them.

  • What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

The role of women in developing the country is inevitable, as women today are key drivers of the economic growth with their entrepreneur qualities. Women are willing and able to take up any challenge that will make a contribution toward the positive development of their respective countries or communities.

  • In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

Working twice as hard as men do and taking every opportunity granted and proving that women are able to do anything and everything with the right amount of encouragement and support.

  • In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

More stable than it currently is, as women are born leaders and nurturers they would be able to run the country better and be able to put the needs of the country and its inhabitants first and selflessly make them a priority at all times.

  • Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

That you are here for a reason on this earth to make a positive change and impact people’s lives, do not be discouraged by the challenges that you will face rather let them be your guide and strength to greater treasures and successes. Lastly that you may fight a battle more than once to win it, and always remember to include GOD in all that you do.

 

 

Activator Penester Tjale’s super power is love

Name: Sehlorana Penester Tjale

Province: Gauteng

Facebook: MamaGaopalelwe Tjale

What is the essence of being a woman to you?

Being a woman means encouraging, empowering and showing love in abundance to everyone

What is your super power?

Love

What words would you use to describe yourself?

Kind, welcoming and humble

Do you relate to Women’s Month? If yes, why is it significant to you? If no, why is it not significant to you?

Yes, it’s about celebrating who we are as women and what we can do in our communities.

  • They say behind every man is a strong woman, is this a statement you relate to?

No

  • How do you think society perceives women?

Society perceives women as weak and vulnerable. Which is not true.

  • How are you #CommittedToChange in your role as a woman?

I am empowering young women in my community and encouraging them to follow the scientific route.

  • What do you think the role of women is in developing the country?

Women’s role is of utmost importance in developing our country as I believe we give birth to the nation, nurture it and let it grow into the best it can be, with a woman’s guidance of course.

In a world that favours men, how are you fulfilling your role as a woman?

I have to admit it is quite difficult to fulfill my role, because not only am I overlooked due to the fact that I am a woman and I am black and I am also told that I cannot do certain things as they require a man’s strength. Therefore it means I have to work extra hard to prove my capabilities.

  • In your words, what would South Africa look like if it had a female president?

It would be a much better country in a sense that women would be prioritised and empowering them would be one of the most important aspects. It would also encourage young women to believe that it is possible to become a leader in this man’s world.

  • Given what you know now, what advice would you give to your younger self?

I would advise my younger self to be patient and study further.